Courses

ACCT 2101 - Principles of Accounting I

Prerequisite: MATH 1111
This course is a study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts. Students who successfully complete ACCT 2101 will be able to:

  • Explain accounting concepts and principles
  • Describe the financial statements of the proprietorship and explain how they interrelate
  • Explain how the matching concept relates to the accrual basis of accounting, summarize the adjustment process and prepare an adjusted trial balance
  • Explain the need for internal control and define the accounting system in which they would be used
  • Prepare bank reconciliation and journalize necessary entries
  • Compute the cost of inventory under periodic and perpetual inventory systems using the first-in first-out method, last-in last-out method and average cost
  • Compute depreciation using the straight-line, units of production, and declining balance method
  • Determine employer liabilities for payroll

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Written term paper
  • Instructor Bagley Classes: Extensive use of EXCEL spreadsheets and formulas.
  • Proctored Tests – this course requires 4 proctored tests. Students living in the Albany/Cordele area may test at the testing center at Albany State University (East, West or Cordele Campuses) – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. Albany State University's off-site proctor policy will be found in the course as well. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

Additional Requirements:

ACCT 2102 - Principles of Accounting II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ACCT 2101

This course is a study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts. Students who successfully complete ACCT 2102 will be able to:

  • Describe the differences between managerial and financial accounting
  • Evaluate the organizational role of managerial accountants
  • Define and illustrate materials, factory labor, and factory overhead costs
  • Use job order cost information for decision making
  • Distinguish between job order costing and process costing systems.
  • Classify costs by their behavior.
  • Describe and illustrate income analysis under variable costing and absorption costing
  • Describe budgeting its objectives its impact on human behavior
  • Understand performance evaluation using variances
  • Explain the nature and importance of capital investment analysis
  • Compare and contrast just-in-time manufacturing practices with traditional manufacturing practices.

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Instructor Bagley Classes: Extensive use of EXCEL spreadsheets and formulas.
  • Proctored Tests – this course requires 4 proctored tests. Students living in the Albany/Cordele area may test at the testing center at Albany State University (East, West or Cordele campuses) – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. Albany State University's off-site proctor policy will be found in the course as well. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

Additional Requirements:

ACCT 4111 - Auditing I and Assurance Services

Prerequisites: ACCT 3101

Principles and problems of auditing financial statements with emphasis on GAAS, Rules of Conduct, Code of Ethics, Internal Control, and Audit Report.

ACCT 6101 - Accounting Analysis for Decision Making

This course is designed to familiarize the student with applications of accounting data in decision making; cost analysis as applied in the development of budgets; and standards as an accounting tool for cost control and pricing. A case problem that requires students to interpret and discuss their analysis in the context of managerial decision-making is used. Offered: Fall.

ACCT 6102 - Mangerial/Cost Accounting

This is a study of budgeting, standard costing, cost-volume profit analysis, performance evaluation, and variable costing. also covers new developments in the area of costing Prerequisite: ACCT 6101. Offered: Spring .

ACCT 6112 - Advance Auditing I

A detailed study of audit procedures includes audit sampling, tests of controls, and substantive tests. Prerequisite: ACCT 6101. Offered: Summer .

ACCT 6131 - Advanced Accounting I

This course is a study of financial accounting and reporting related to partnerships, branches, segmental and interim reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 6101. Offered: Fall .

ACCT 6141 - Municipal Accounting

Fund theory, generally accepted accounting principles, and accounting practice and reporting for state and local governments. Prerequisite: ACCT 6101. Offered: Summer .

ALHE 1103 - Orientation to MLT

This course provides an introduction to basic clinical laboratory science and web based instruction. Students learn about the organizational structure of a clinical laboratory, regulation of quality and reliability of testing, personnel qualifications, safety, medical-legal issues, specimen collection and processing, principles of instrumentation and laboratory mathematics.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

ALHE 1115 - Clinical Professionalism

This course addresses key competency areas for health care professionals. Elements including communication skills, time management, professional development, personal skills, policies and procedures, motivation and attitude, and the medical record are emphasized.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

ALHE 1120 - Medical Terminology

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: ENGL 0989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

Medical terminology approached through roots, prefixes, and suffixes of medical terms. Definition and spelling of anatomical, diagnostic, symptomatic and operative medical terms are covered.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

ALHE 2050 - Health Care Delivery Systems

Credits: 1 Prerequisite: None

A general overview of the health care delivery system with specific emphasis on the allied health professions. The concept of a multidisciplinary team approach to patient/client management will be emphasized. Students will develop an awareness of the relationships among and between allied health disciplines.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

ARTS 1100 - Art Appreciation

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None

Art Appreciation selected examples of work from a cross section of historical and contemporary visual art forms will be examined in terms of our evolving visual vocabulary. Attention to contributions of cultures, past and present. Students who successfully complete ARTS 1100 will:

  • Possess an appreciation of the art and architecture of the past and present
  • Possess the necessary language and skills to analyze a work of art from a design point of view
  • Possess a basic understanding of the elements of art and the principles of design
  • Be able to differentiate between the materials and techniques used to create art
  • Understand art in its historical context

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, discussions, and quizzes
  • Extra Credit may be received by visiting museums, galleries, plays, or other cultural events, as well as online gallery visits
  • Completion of one written research paper
  • Completion of a minimum of three studio and research projects on art work or tests related to course topics
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Instructor Carter Only: This course requires students to visit in person (not virtually) an art/history museum or art exhibit in the student’s local area.

ASU 1101 - First Year Experience/Pathway to Success

ASU 1101 is a one-credit hour course designed to help students develop strategies and skills necessary for a successful college career. Course goals include developing academic skills, identifying campus resources and services, developing a connection to the institution, establishing self-exploration and personal development, and understanding behaviors related to health and wellness.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion questions
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

Some instructors may require one proctor exam for this course. Proctored Tests – This course requires 1 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

BIOL 1100K - Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Care Professional

Credits: 4 Pre-requisite: Completion of ENGL 0989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Care Professional is a survey of general principles of human anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on medical applications. It is restricted to students in Allied Health Science programs or requires the consent of the division chair. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. A student who successfully completes BIOL 1100K should:

  • Have an understanding of human anatomy and physiology
  • Possess a working knowledge of critical components, structures, and functions of the human systems.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes, assignments, and discussions
  • On-line lab assignments require the dissection of specimens (sheep brain and cow eye)
  • Students who live near Albany State University will pick-up the specimens in the Science/Math Division, those who live outside of the Albany State University area will have the specimens mailed to them.

Additional Requirements:

  • Dissection specimens (already paid for in your course fees)
  • Digital camera (phone camera will work) for certain assignments
  • A scanner for submission of labs by email is very helpful
  • Computer headphones with microphone is highly recommended, but you may use the speakers and microphone that are integrated with your computer
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Printer
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 5 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University’s testing centers (East, West, or Cordele Campuses) or online through Proctor U. Testing through Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.
  • There is an additional $40 Science Fee associated with this course.

BIOL 1110K - Introduction to Environmental Biology

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: None

This course will give students the background necessary to understand complex environmental issues that they may hear about in the media or may be asked to vote on. It will help the student understand environmental interactions including, how humans impact the world we live in. This course is designed for non-science majors.

A student who successfully completes BIOL 1110K will be able to:

  • Discuss the complex environmental issues that are presented in the media
  • Compare and contrast point and non-point source pollutants
  • Compare and contrast the environmental effects of economies in developing versus developed nations
  • Discuss the complications of national and international laws on environmental issues
  • Discuss the current and past causes of extinction, and factors contributing to current causes of extinction and present logical arguments for and against the preservation of endangered species.
  • Compare the chemistries of air, water, and soil pollution problems and identify factors that lead to soil loss and degradation.
  • Discuss U.S. freshwater supply problems and different ways to get freshwater.
  • Discuss the laws related to mineral leasing.
  • Discuss the types and sources of hazardous waste and compare and contrast various ways of storing and processing hazardous waste
  • Compare and contrast renewable and non-renewable resources and state the expected life of major non-renewable resources
  • Compare and contrast various methods for the generation of electricity, and the costs and dangers associated with each.
  • State the current U.S. and world populations and discuss the effects of population growth and ways to control it, as well as discuss the relationship between population growth and other environmental problems.

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and laboratory exercises.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft WORD and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 1 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State’s Albany or Cordele campuses or online through Proctor U. Testing through Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

BIOL 1111K - Intro to Biological Sciences

Course Pre-requisite: Completion or exemption of all learning support requirements.

Credits: 4

A course designed for non-science majors that emphasizes fundamental concepts of the cell (i.e. cell structure and function, mitosis and metabolism), and plant anatomy and physiology through the use of lectures, audio visual aids, selected laboratory experiments, and demonstrations.

BIOL 1112K - Intro to Biological Sciences II

Course Pre-requisite: BIOL 1111K

Credits: 4

A course designed for non-science majors that emphasizes human anatomy and physiology, classical and molecular genetics, evolution, ecology, and surveys the plant and animal kingdoms through lectures, audio-visual aids, selected laboratory experiments, and demonstrations.

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and laboratory exercises.

Additional Requirements:

BIOL 2001 - Introduction to Research

Course Pre-requisite: BIOL 1111K, CHEM 1212K, PHYS 1112K or consent of Division Dean.

Credits: 2

This course is designed specifically to teach students pursuing degrees in health professions the basic principles of performing a scientific research project. Each student will identify a problem, perform a literature search, design and perform an experiment, analyze data and present the results.

BIOL 2107K - Principles of Biology I

Credits: 4 Pre-requisite: Completion of English composition I with C or better or exemption of all learning support requirements - (Only for BIO Majors)

This class is the first part of a two course sequence for students majoring in Biology. Biology I is the first part of a two course sequence required for students majoring in Biology. Designed specifically for the Biology major, discussions will include the chemistry of macromolecules in biological systems, cell structure and function, membrane structure and function, energy and metabolism, photosynthesis, cell communication, mitosis and meiosis, DNA structure, transcription and translation. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

A student who successfully completes BIOL 2107K will:

  • Possess a strong foundation in the basic principles of biology and a strong framework that will enable him or her to succeed in advanced biology courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and laboratory exercises.
  • Proctored Tests – this course requires 5 proctored tests . Students living in the Albany/Cordele area may test at the testing center at Albany State University (East, West or Cordele Campuses)– students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. Albany State University’s off-site proctor policy may be found in the course. This course has more stringent standards than Albany State University’s minimum requirements. Libraries, K-12 schools, and administrators are routinely denied. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

Additional Requirements:

BIOL 2108K - Principles of Biology II

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: BIOL 2107K

Biology II is the second part of the two course sequence required for students majoring in Biology. The two course sequence is designed to give students a broad foundation in the biological sciences that will enable them to pursue advanced courses in the biology curriculum. The continuity and diversity of life, evolution and activities of plant and animal life and its environment will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the following topics: classical and molecular genetics, organic evolution, plant and animal reproduction, human anatomy and physiology, ecology and environment. Selected laboratory exercises are used to emphasize the continuity, evolution and activities of plan and animal life which includes classical and molecular genetics, organic evolution, plant and animal reproduction, human anatomy and physiology, ecology and the environment.

A student who successfully completes BIOL 2108K will:

  • Possess a strong foundation in the basic principles of biology and a strong framework that will enable him or her to succeed in advanced biology courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and laboratory exercises.
  • Proctored Tests – this course requires 5 proctored tests. Students living in the Albany/Cordele area may test at the testing center at Albany State University (East, West or Cordele Campuses) – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. Albany State University’s off-site proctor policy may be found in the course. This course has more stringent standards than Albany State University’s minimum requirements. Libraries, K-12 schools, and administrators are routinely denied. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

Additional Requirements:

BIOL 2211K - Introduction to Microbiology - HYBRID (Not Fully Online)

*Important! BIOL 2211K Introduction to Microbiology. IS A HYBRID (not fully online)

This course offered at Albany State University as a hybrid option with the coursework online and the Lab on campus. In order to accommodate students who must travel to campus, we typically offer a few different sections with one (long) lab a week to minimize travel time including some Saturday only labs. If traveling to our campus is not feasible for you, please contact your advisor for assistance obtaining a transient permission letter to take this course at an institution near you.

BIOL 2411K - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Credits: 4 Completion or exemption of all learning support requirements.

This course is designed as an introductory course in human anatomy and physiology. Discussions include fundamental concepts related to the gross and microscopic structure and functional relationships of the integument, bones, muscles, nerves and endocrine organs. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

A student who successfully completes BIOL 2411K should:

  • Have an understanding of human anatomy and physiology
  • Possess a working knowledge of critical components, structures, and functions of the human systems.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • On-line lab assignments require the dissection of specimens (sheep brain and cow eye)
  • Students who live near Albany State University will pick-up the specimens in the Science/Math Division, those who live outside of the Albany State University area will have the specimens mailed to them.

Additional Requirements:

  • Dissection specimens (already paid for in your course fees)
  • Digital camera (phone camera will work) for certain assignments
  • A scanner for submission of labs by email is very helpful
  • Computer headphones with microphone is highly recommended, but you may use the speakers and microphone that are integrated with your computer
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Printer
  • Some of the labs require common household item
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 5 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University’s testing centers (East, West, or Cordele Campuses) or online through Proctor U. Testing through Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.
  • There is an additional $40 Science Fee associated with this course.

BIOL 2412K - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Credits: 4 Pre-requisite: BIOL 2411K or BIOL 2108K.

This course is a continuation of human anatomy and physiology I (BIOL 2411). Discussion will focus on the structure and functions of body systems (endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive). Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

  • A student who successfully completes BIOL 2412K should: Have an understanding of human anatomy and physiology
  • Possess a working knowledge of critical components, structures, and functions of the human systems.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • On-line lab assignments require the dissection of specimens (sheep heart and sheep kidney)
  • Students who live near Albany State University will pick-up the specimens in the Science/Math Division, those who live outside of the Albany State University area will have the specimens mailed to them.

Additional Requirements:

  • Dissection specimens (already paid for in your course fees)
  • Digital camera (phone camera will work) for certain assignments
  • A scanner for submission of labs by email is very helpful
  • Computer headphones with microphone is highly recommended, but you may use the speakers and microphone that are integrated with your computer
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Printer
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 5 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University’s testing centers (East, West, or Cordele Campuses) or online through Proctor U. Testing through Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.
  • There is an additional $40 Science Fee associated with this course.

BUSA 1100 - Financial Planning and Investment Management

Credits: 2

This course provides the foundation for studying and applying personal financial planning techniques for a lifetime. This course will focus on six broad key steps to personal financial success:

  1. Financial planning- focusing on establishing and achieving long-term goals through planning and budgeting
  2. Money management- centering on minimizing income taxes and efficient utilization of cash and credit
  3. Managing expenditures- especially for “big-ticket” items such as vehicles and housing,
  4. Income and asset protection through insurance- so that hard-earned resources and assets are not placed at undue risk,
  5. Investment planning- with its focus on selecting the appropriate investment vehicles based on objectives at hand and the relative levels of investment risk,
  6. Retirement and estate planning- with the ultimate goal of being able to live off of one’s financial nest egg and plan for the transfer of assets to heirs.

Students who successfully complete BUSA 1100 will be able to:

  • Apply the techniques of personal financial planning and its implementation throughout this course.
  • Practice the cash flow and budgeting process.
  • Explain debt management techniques.
  • Find the best way to select a financial services institution.
  • Identify some of the common risks in everyone’s life and discuss different means to protect against those risks.
  • Identify the tools and techniques of investments.
  • Explain retirement planning.
  • Discuss various steps about buying a house.
  • Define federal income taxes and discuss how to minimize these taxes.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

BUSA 1105 - Introduction to Business

Credits: 3 Prerequisites: READ 0099, ENGL 0099, ENGL 0989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher; MATH 0099, MATH 0987, MATH 0989 or satisfactory math scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

BUSA 1105 is an integrative study of the functional areas of business (finance, operations, marketing, human resources, etc.)

Students who successfully complete BUSA 1105 will be able to:

  • Describe the terms used in business
  • Identify the forms of ownership, social responsibility, ethical influences, and the legal system that regulates business
  • Explain the concepts and scope of international business
  • Compare and contrast management styles and organizations, and to apply the aspects of productions and operations to particular products
  • Analyze the aspects of marketing such as products, lines and role of pricing, distribution, and promotion
  • Evaluate the financial aspects of business, including the role of money and financing, risk management, and insurance
  • Describe the role of research and development in the product development process
  • Identify the fundamentals of information for business including accounting, the need for computers, and the management of information

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Instructor YATES: Proctored Tests – This course requires 1 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State’s Albany or Cordele campuses or online through Proctor U. Testing through Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

BUSA 2101 - Survey of Computer Applications

Prerequisites: None

3 credit hours

An introduction to computers and computer applications at a level appropriate for basic academic and professional needs.

BUSA 3100 - Business Internship

Credits: 3

This course introduces junior or advanced sophomore business students to working environments in their aspiring professional careers with an opportunity to gain valuable insights into actual organizational and managerial practices and operations. Through such experiences students can better correlate their academic experiences with their future professional careers.

BUSA 4105 - International Business

Prerequisite: ECON 2105

Credits: 3

Contemporary problems, issues, and opportunities in international business from conceptual and practical viewpoints. Extensive use of case studies to develop student abilities to diagnose and develop solution to management situations facing the multinational executive.

CHEM 1151K - Survey of Chemistry I

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: Exit Learning Support

This class covers the basic principles of chemistry including atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, bonding, solution chemistry, organic chemistry, and a brief introduction to biochemistry.

A student who successfully completes CHEM 1151K should be able to:

  • Classify matter
  • Interconvert and make use of various units/systems of measurement
  • Describe the structure of atoms
  • Use the periodic table to identify physical and chemical properties of the elements
  • Name compounds and describe their bonding
  • Balance chemical equations and perform stoichiometric calculations
  • Use the gas laws to solve for changes in gas properties; identify properties of solids and liquids
  • Describe the properties of solutions
  • List factors affecting reaction rate and discuss chemical equilibria
  • Identify acids and bases, use the pH scale, and work titration problems

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes, assignments, and exams
  • On-line lab assignments utilizing common household materials

Additional Requirements:

  • Scientific Calculator – non-graphing (Graphing calculators are fine, but not required)
  • Safety Glasses – should comply with ANSI Z87.1-1989, “American National Standard Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.” (Make sure the safety glasses purchased are stamped with Z87, which signifies they meet OSHA standards.)
  • Laboratory assignments use basic household materials.

CHEM 1152k - Survey of Chemistry II

This course is the second in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general and organic chemistry and ciochemistry‌ designed for Allied Health Profession Majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises will supplement the lecture material.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1151k

CHEM 1211K - Principles of Chemistry I

Credits: 4 Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

This course is the first part of a two-semester general chemistry curriculum. It is primarily designed for students with career interests in chemistry, biology, medicine, pharmacy and other STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. This course covers basic chemistry: the fundamental concepts concerning the atomic and molecular structures and properties of matter, states of matter, stoichiometry, chemical equations and various types of equilibrium in solution including electrochemistry. Laboratory exercises supplement lectures.

A student who successfully completes CHEM 1211K will be able to:

  • Classify matter
  • Interconvert and make use of various units/systems of measurement
  • Use the periodic table to identify the atomic and electronic structure of atoms of the elements
  • Name and write formulas for compounds
  • Complete and balance chemical reactions
  • Perform stoichiometric calculations for chemical reactions
  • Use the gas laws to predict conditions for gaseous substances
  • Determine enthalpy changes for chemical reactions using calorimetric or tabulated data
  • Describe and distinguish ionic and covalent bonding
  • Perform measurements using laboratory instruments and data acquisition devices
  • Use the scientific method in safely carrying out laboratory experiments.

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and laboratory exercises
  • Proctored Tests – Instructor Mutisya requires 4 proctor exams other instructors require 2 . This course requires 4 - 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

CHEM 1212K - Principles of Chemistry II

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CHEM 1211K

This course is the second part of a two-semester general chemistry sequence. It is primarily designed for students with career interests in chemistry, biology, medicine, pharmacy and other science fields. It will mainly deal with states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids/bases and pH with corresponding laboratory activities. The laboratory activity is extremely important to enhance understanding of the materials learned from lecture.

A student who successfully completes CHEM 1212K should be able to:

  • Predict the structure of molecular substances and describe their bonding
  • Identify intermolecular forces
  • Describe the properties of solutions, express solution concentration, and identify the colligative properties
  • Determine the rate laws for chemical reactions, identify feasible reaction mechanisms, and list the factors affecting reaction rate
  • Identify acids and bases, acid/base strength, and calculate pH for acids, bases, salts, and buffers; prepare and utilize titration curves in predicting acid/base strength
  • Describe and determine the effects of solubility equilibria
  • Predict and determine the spontaneity and entropy and free energy changes for chemical reactions
  • Balance oxidation-reduction reactions, identify the parts of electrochemical cells, and determine cell potentials
  • Identify types of nuclear processes
  • Perform measurements using laboratory instructions and data acquisition devices and use the scientific method in safely carrying out laboratory experiments.

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and laboratory exercises
  • Proctored Tests – Instructor Mutisya requires 4 proctor exams other instructors require 2 . This course requires 4 - 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

COMM 1000 - Cultural Diversity in Communication

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: ENGL 989

This class introduces students to areas of study, which expand their knowledge, and appreciation of today’s multi-cultural and multi-racial world. Students will learn methods for preparing and delivering effective presentations, while studying different cultures and learning how to be sensitive to the differences between people. Students who successfully complete COMM 1000 will be able to:

  • Analyze the basic components of major global cultures and core ideas of intercultural communication processes
  • Analyze the differences and similarities between intercultural interactions and identities from within their own perspectives.
  • Develop and utilize appropriate visual aids in presentations.
  • Gain speaking experience and confidence in their speaking skills
  • Demonstrate effective listening skills and apply constructive evaluations to peer speeches.

Course Requirements:

  • Journal entries and class activities, as well as written assignments
  • A minimum of four individual speeches, which will increase in length (3 to 6 minutes) and complexity (personal experience to researching current events)
  • Utilization of library resources and research skills
  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • JAVA, Chrome Browser (preferred)
  • Audacity software (a free voice-recording program)
  • Digital video recording device (i.e.: webcam - NO Mobile Devices)
  • Computer microphone
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and PowerPoint
  • This class requires up to two one-hour synchronous meetings which will be conducted via web technologies. These meetings will allow you to present up to two live speeches. Your instructor will post optional times for each speech at the start of the term.

COMM 1100 - Human Communications

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 989

This course will guide students through the process of learning the basic principles and contexts of communication. Human Communications provides a broad approach to oral communication skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public speaking. The course will also examine intercultural and mass communication. The student who successfully completes COMM 1100 will:

  • Possess the ability to prepare and deliver speeches as an individual and in groups

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and test
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • JAVA, Chrome Browser (preferred)
  • Audacity software (a free voice-recording program)
  • Digital video recording device (i.e.: webcam - NO Mobile Devices)
  • Computer microphone
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and PowerPoint
  • This class requires up to two one-hour synchronous meetings which will be conducted via web technologies. These meetings will allow you to present up to two live speeches. Your instructor will post optional times for each speech at the start of the term.

COMM 1110 - Public Speaking

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 0989

This class focuses on public speaking in a variety of settings, and meets three general education areas: communication, critical thinking, and technology. Students will focus on the organization of materials and the vocal physical aspects of delivery in various speaking situations. The basic concepts, vocabulary, theories, and processes relevant to understanding public communication will be introduced. Students who successfully complete COMM 1110 will:

  • Possess an appreciation of today’s multi-cultural and multi-racial world
  • Understand methods for analyzing an audience
  • Be able to develop the main points of a speech including, effective introductions and conclusions, and nonverbal delivery techniques

Course Requirements:

  • A minimum of five speeches
  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • This class requires up to two one-hour synchronous meetings which will be conducted via web technologies. These meetings will allow you to present up to two live speeches. Your instructor will post optional times for each speech at the start of the term.

Additional Requirements:

  • JAVA, Chrome Browser (preferred)
  • Audacity software (a free voice-recording program)
  • Digital video recording device (i.e.: webcam - NO Mobile Devices)
  • Computer microphone
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and PowerPoint
  • This class requires up to two one-hour synchronous meetings which will be conducted via web technologies. These meetings will allow you to present up to two live speeches. Your instructor will post optional times for each speech at the start of the term.

COMM 1111 - Issues in Argumentation and Advocacy

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 989

This course investigates the nature of argumentation in personal, social, and political processes of controversial issues in public policy. Special focus will be on oral presentations of developed argumentative discourses and practice of the practical skills of public debate employed in advocacy. Students who successfully complete COMM 1111 will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of argument and advocacy
  • Be able to construct affirmative and negative case analyses on current issues
  • Be able to apply skills in research, building evidence, case development, flow-charting, and evaluation techniques
  • Gain experience in competitive debate techniques and cross-examination style debates

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • JAVA, Chrome Browser (preferred)
  • Audacity software (a free voice-recording program)
  • Digital video recording device (i.e.: webcam - NO Mobile Devices)
  • Computer microphone
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and PowerPoint
  • This class requires up to two one-hour synchronous meetings which will be conducted via web technologies. These meetings will allow you to present up to two live speeches. Your instructor will post optional times for each speech at the start of the term.

COMM 2105 - Introduction to Interpersonal Communication Online

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 989

This class examines the dynamics of communication, focusing on basic processes in face-to-face interaction. Through this course, students will analyze the variability of design, production, exchange, and interpretation of messages in relational family, professional, and cultural contexts. Students who successfully complete COMM 2105 will be able to:

  • Assess personal traits in themselves and others utilizing behavioral and relational theories of communication
  • Apply verbal and nonverbal concepts to all speeches
  • Analyze audiences in the preparation of presentations

Course Requirements:

  • A minimum of three speeches
  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • JAVA, Chrome Browser (preferred)
  • Audacity software (a free voice-recording program)
  • Digital video recording device (i.e.: webcam - NO Mobile Devices)
  • Computer microphone
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and PowerPoint
  • This class requires up to two one-hour synchronous meetings which will be conducted via web technologies. These meetings will allow you to present up to two live speeches. Your instructor will post optional times for each speech at the start of the term.

COMM 2220 - Introduction to Small Group Communication

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: Satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

This course examines the dynamics of the group communication process, focusing on basic theories of group communication and emphasizes performance-based application within the group setting. Analyses of listening in groups, verbal and nonverbal communication, conflict and cohesion, argumentation, and decision-making are included. The oral communication component offers experience formulating and delivering group presentations. Students who successfully complete COMM 2220 will be able to:

  • Identify principles of small group communication
  • Identify how to plan and conduct meetings, how to set meeting agendas, and how to apply parliamentary procedure
  • Apply verbal and nonverbal efforts to all presentations
  • Analyze audiences in the preparation of presentation

Course Requirements:

  • A minimum of three speeches
  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • JAVA, Chrome Browser (preferred)
  • Audacity software (a free voice-recording program)
  • Digital video recording device (i.e.: webcam - NO Mobile Devices)
  • Computer microphone
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and PowerPoint
  • This class requires up to two one-hour synchronous meetings which will be conducted via web technologies. These meetings will allow you to present up to two live speeches. Your instructor will post optional times for each speech at the start of the term.

COMM 3330 - Advanced Communication Skills-eMajor only

Analysis and application of interpersonal, small group, and mediated communication skills as effective speaking, listening, negotiation, conflict management, presentation, and media interviewing.

COPR 1122 - Introduction to Instructional Technology

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to the use of computers, software and the Internet in the online academic setting. This course will offer a survey of the theory of instructional design and the use of the computer as an instructional tool. It will include online lectures and discussions, textbook readings, and hands on activities to introduce the student to instructional technology.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic computer skills: Typing, Internet use, E-mail, etc.
  • Requires at least one synchronous class meeting.

Additional Requirements:

COPR 1123 - Web-based Tools and Applications for Education

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to the selection, creation, utilization, and evaluation of web-based tools in the online classroom environment. The most important objective of this course is for students to become empowered to effectively integrate instructional technology into their teaching and professional experiences. This course provides a positive beginning to a lifelong learning process. Throughout this course students will be introduced to web-based technologies and will experience the use of these tools in educational settings with a focus on technological solutions in support of a professional career.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic-to-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.
  • Requires at least one synchronous class meeting.

Additional Requirements:

COPR 1124 - Online Communication Technologies

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None

This course will introduce students to a variety of communication technologies that can be used in the online classroom environment. Students will learn how to use discussion boards, email, voice/video chat, instant messaging, and blog/journaling within their courses to enhance student-teacher and student-student communication.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic computer skills: Typing, Internet use, E-mail, etc.
  • Requires at least one synchronous class meeting.

Additional Requirements:

COPR 1125 - Instructional Design of the Online Course

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None

This is a course designed to familiarize students with the process of instructional design. This course will introduce students to the systematic process of analyzing the learner, developing & selecting objectives, assessment instruments, and instructional materials and evaluating and re-evaluating the instructional design of a course.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic computer skills: Typing, Internet use, E-mail, etc.
  • Requires at least one synchronous class meeting.

Additional Requirements:

COPR 1131 - Success in Online Instruction and Learning

This course is designed for those who are or may be facilitating online courses. This course demonstrates and shares a spectrum of online learning concepts, theories, and principles using interactive and collaborative experiences. It is designed to improve the facilitation skills of faculty members and business trainers who offer online courses and is focused on theory, concepts, and practices for effective online facilitation.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic computer skills: Typing, Internet use, E-mail, etc.
  • Requires at least one synchronous class meeting.

Additional Requirements:

COPR 2235 - Database Management Systems

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: BUSA 2101

This course will study database management theory and practice. Experience with designing, creating and using databases will be gained through hands-on projects using software packages such as Microsoft Access. Students are expected to develop an in-depth, working understanding of the various functions of a database management system. Students who successfully complete Database Management Systems will be able to:

  • Write basic SQL scripts
  • Design a database
  • Perform Entity-Relationship Modeling
  • Normalize a database
  • Maintain a database
  • Manage database security, back-up, and recovery

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers, computer applications, and troubleshooting.
  • A Windows computer (this course cannot be completed with a Mac) and a version of Microsoft Office that includes Microsoft Access. There is no version of Access that runs on a Mac.
  • The specific requirements will depend upon textbook and software availability. Contact the college bookstore or instructor before you purchase any materials.

Additional Requirements:

COUN 5000 - Introduction to Counseling Profession

This course offers an introduction and orientation to the counseling profession. The course includes studies of the history and philosophy of the profession; contemporary and emerging trends in counseling; professional organizations, publications, credentialing requirements including certification and licensure and accreditation standards; advocacy, public policy, and ethical codes that shape professional practice.

COUN 5001 - Introduction to Professional Writing

This is an introductory course in professional writing. Scholarly writing using APA publication comprises the primary course activity.

COUN 5002 - Professional Issues in Counseling

This critical thinking course will assist students with conceptualization and synthesis of current issues and trends in Professional Counseling. Through review and critical analysis of counseling research and publications, will deepen students' knowledge of trends and issues influencing the profession.

COUN 5500 - Theories of Counseling*

This course introduces students to the theories and principles of counseling, alternative theoretical strategies and the process of counseling. Points of convergence and divergence will be discussed.

COUN 5501 - Lifespan Development*

This course offers an introduction to the study of human development from conception through death. Theories of development of physical, psychological, psychosocial, cognitive, moral aspects of human development are presented. The course also explores environmental and genetic factors, developmental crises and transitions, family development, and community influences as they relate to optimal and exceptional development.

COUN 5504 - Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling

This course presents the history and philosophy of rehabilitation counseling. The course will discuss public and private vocational rehabilitation systems; relevant legislation; professional credentialing issues including certification, licensure, and accreditation; systems knowledge of healthcare, education, and rehabilitation; and public policy and advocacy strategies for counselors and consumers. The ecological perspective and ethical codes of conduct will be discussed.

COUN 5506 - School Counseling Foundations

This course provides an overview of principles of school counseling. Counseling services, practices and basic concepts relating to organization and operation of school counseling programs are offered. Emphasis is placed on theories of human growth and development and the implementation of a developmentally appropriate school counseling program. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Coordinator.

COUN 5508 - Introduction to Mental Health Counseling

Students are introduced to the history, philosophy, and theoretical foundations of the clinical mental health counseling professions, including the scope of practice, credentialing, professional roles, functions, and relationships with other helpers. This course provides an overview of the clinical mental health counseling program; self-care strategies appropriate to the counselor role; professional organizations and licensure; and the roles of professional counselors in advocacy and the promotion of social justice.

COUN 5510 - Assessment in Counselor Education

Students in this course are provided with an overview of assessments used in counseling, rehabilitation, and education as well as the responsibilities of counselors using assessments. Students learn about the tests used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings, and they examine the psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. Topics included in this course are statistical concepts, and common assessment formats for measuring constructs such as personality, pathology, achievement, aptitude, and career interests. There will also be a focus on assessment critique, administration and interpretation of assessment results, and incorporating assessment results into work with clients and students. Prerequisite: Admission to the Counselor Education Program.

COUN 5512 - Counseling Strategies and Techniques

An experimental approach to more effective interpersonal communication, this course offers the opportunity for awareness, personal growth and understanding of self and other, and communication of that self-awareness and understanding. This course is designed to teach basic skills of the helping relationship and the structure of the basic counseling interview. Through skills practice, students develop a better understanding of the relationship between theory and practice. Prerequisite: COUN 5500.

COUN 5514 - Counseling Children and Adolescents

This course covers salient considerations for counseling children and adolescents, emphasizing the effects of such factors as disability, cultural diversity, substance abuse, behavioral disorders, and academic development. Students learn appropriate strategies and techniques to assess behavior and meet the needs of children and adolescents and common medications that affect learning, behavior, and mood in children and adolescents. Simulation, observations, and in-class role plays are incorporated throughout this course. Prerequisites: COUN 5501 and COUN 5512.

COUN 5515 - Group Counseling and Dynamics

The experiential course emphasizes the nature of groups and the dynamics of group interaction as well as the legal and ethical standards related to group counseling. Students design, implement, and facilitate counseling groups. Prerequisite: COUN 5512.

COUN 5517 - Couples and Family Counseling

Using a systems prespective for understanding the dynamics of families and couples, this course provides students with theories, knowledge, and skills related to major models of family counseling and related interventions as a rationale for selecting appropriate modalities for assessment and counseling. Prerequisite: COUN 5512.

COUN 5519 - Addiction Counseling

This course provides an orientation to and introductory framework for recognizing and treating addictions and abuses. Students develop conceptual knowledge, practical skills, and self-awareness concerning the etiology of addiction, assessment strategies, and diagnosis and treatment planning as evidenced in the current professional literature. Theories of addiction counseling and application of these theories comprise a significant part of this course. Co-occuring disorders, such as process addictions and mental illnesses are also addressed. Prerequisite: COUN 5500.

COUN 5519 - Addiction Counseling

This course provides an orientation to and introductory framework for recognizing and treating addictions and abuses. Students develop conceptual knowledge, practical skills, and self-awareness concerning the etiology of addiction, assessment strategies, and diagnosis and treatment planning as evidenced in the current professional literature. Theories of addiction counseling and application of these theories comprise a significant part of this course. Co-occuring disorders, such as process addictions and mental illnesses are also addressed. Prerequisite: COUN 5500.

COUN 5520 - Multicultural Counseling: Theory & Practice

An examination of relationships, issues and trends in the context of a diverse society related to such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics,family, religious and spiritual values, education, socioeconomic status and the unique characteristics of individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities. Prerequisite: COUN 5500.

COUN 5525 - Case Management

This course covers case management concepts, systems, processes and competencies necessary for effective service delivery to persons with disabilities and their families. Information regarding the range and level of community and professional resources, service, and products that facilitate the quality of life, independent living, and work for individuals with disabilities in rural settings is integrated into the course; strategies for caseload management, cost effective service coordination, vendor selection, conflict management, and evaluation are addressed. Prerequisites: COUN 5504, 5550, 5551, 5510.

COUN 5528 - School Counseling in P-12 Settings

This course of the application of counseling at the elementary, middle, and secondary school levels. Emphasis is placed on the design and implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program. Peer facilitation, alternative programs and assessing the need for programs, informing administrators, teachers, parents and students about services, advertising, and recruitment will be covered. Prerequisite: COUN 5500.

COUN 5529 - Curriculum and Program Coordination

This course examines the organization of comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs in the elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as the design and implementation of the school counseling curriculum for grades P-12. The counselor's role as program coordinator focuses upon needs assessments, curriculum planning and implementation, time and resource management, public relations, and program evaluation. Ethical and diversity issues are emphasized in designing curricula and delivery strategies to address the developmental needs of all students. Prerequisite: COUN 5528.

COUN 5531 - Career Development and Counseling

This course focuses on career development theories and decision making models use of occupational and labor market information, technology-based career market information, technology-based career information systems, career development, and educational planning. Prerequisite: COUN 5500.

COUN 5532 - Vocational Development and Placement

This course provides an overview of vocational development and placement services, including labor market analysis, job analysis, work-site modification and restructuring, employer contacts, supported employment, and retention. The course also discusses the application of technology to the employment of persons with disabilities, post-employment services, job coaching, and natural supports. Prerequisites: COUN 5504, COUN 5531.

COUN 5540 - Prevention, Intervention & Consulation

The course will help students to develop the skills and techniques for effective consultation with clients, educators, parents, and community referral resources, and other clinicians. Theoretical and practical application and practice of specific skills essential to prevention, intervention, and collaboration are emphasized. Prerequisites: COUN 5528 or COUN 5525 or COUN 5508.

COUN 5550 - Medical And Psychosocial Aspects of A Disablity I

This course examines contemporary models of adjustment to disability and explores the impact of culture, individual diversity, and sociological dynamics on disability. Medical terminology and diagnostic criteria and functional limitations are introduced. Prerequisite: COUN 5504.

COUN 5551 - Medical And Psychosocial Aspects of a Disability II

This course explores disabilities from a systems perspective and incorporates fundamental information regarding medical terminology, diagnostic criteria and functional limitations, medical practitioners, assistive technologies, and health care systems as well as adjustment to disability. Consumer adjustment to disability, psychosocial, cultural, and other contextual factors that impact persons with disabilities will be infused throughout this course. Prerequisite: COUN 5550.

COUN 5560 - Diagnosis and Treatment

This course provides a framework for understanding the major diagnostic categories of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Emphasis is given to the principles and practices that relate to the psychopathology, DSM diagnosis, etiology and assessment, systematic treatment planning, interviewing, and short- and long-term interventions. Students examine techniques commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial programs. Through coursework and discussions, students consider multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis as well as current trends and contemporary issues in clinical assessment and diagnosis. Prerequisite: COUN 5700.

COUN 5561 - Psychopharmacology

This course provides an overview of psychotropic medications used in the management of mental, behavioral, and addictive disorders in children and adults. Students will explore basic anatomical, physiological, and chemical characteristics of the nervous system to understand the rationale for using medications, along with their limitations and side effects. Additionally, students explore related historical, social, ethnic, and cultural factors related to counseling and psychotropic medical treatment. Prerequisite: COUN 5560.

COUN 5570 - Practicum

Students complete at least 100 clock hours of supervised clinical experience conducive to the modeling, demonstration, and development of counseling skills. The practicum requires 40 hours of direct service with clients, including experience in individual counseling. Counseling interview will be recorded. Background checks and proof of professional liability insurance coverage are required. Prerequisites: COUN 5501, 5512, 5515, 5531, 5600 or permission of Program Coordinator.

COUN 5575 - Selected Topics in Counseling

This seminar features a combination of lecture, discussion, resarch and presentations. Topics vary each time course is offered. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics. Prerequisites: Permission of the Program Coordinator.

COUN 5595 - Internship I

Internship provides a supervised 600 clock hours of clinical experience in setting. Interns must complete at least 240 direct service clock hours, including experience in individual counseling and group work, and supervision by the University Supervisor and the cooperating onsite counselor. Prerequisite: COUN 5570, or Permission of the Program Coordinator.

COUN 5596 - Thesis

This class offers students the opportunity to develop and defend their research under the supervision of their thesis advisor. Prerequisites: COUN 5570 or Permission of Program Coordinator.

COUN 5598 - Internship II

This course is a continuation of COUN 5595. In this course, students complete their supervised, 600 clock hour internship in a setting appropriate for their specialized field of training. The requirement includes completion of 240 direct service clock hours and supervision by the university supervisor and the cooperating onsite counselor. Prerequisite: COUN 5595.

COUN 5600 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling

Legislative, judicial and ethical mandates germane to professional counselors are presented in this course. Current issues including such topics as confidentiality, use of assessment instruments, family issues, professional identity, and an examination of the ACA Code of Ethics and other professional standards will be covered. Prerequisite: COUN 5528.

COUN 5610 - Crisis Counseling And Intervention

This course provides an overview of the types and models of crisis intervention. Consideration of organization, and client variables including developmental needs, diversity and cultural issues, as well as primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention are addressed. Prerequisite: COUN 5512.

COUN 5620 - Research and Program Evaluation for Counselors

This course presents research methodology, philosophical, ethical, and training issues; major qualitative and quantitative designs; methodological issues, and professional research issues. Students complete training on human subjects review. Prerequisites: COUN 5510 or permission of coordinator.

CRJU 1100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: Satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher

This is a survey course of the essential components of the criminal justice system. These components include police, courts and corrections. The interrelationships between components are illustrated. Processes and procedures within each component are reviewed. This survey course is a prerequisite to subsequent upper division courses. Students who successfully complete CRJU 1100 will be able to:

  • Identify the three components of the criminal justice system and explain the basic function and theory of each
  • Define the role of each component of the system and its relationship to branches and levels of government.
  • Analyze and discuss crime trends on statistical data from the UCR and NCVS.
  • List and interpret constitutional guidelines applicable to criminal justice practitioners, with specific attention on the 4th-8th, and 14th Amendments.
  • Discuss the history and origins of American law enforcement.
  • Identify and discuss contemporary issues in policing.
  • Discuss and critique the adversarial concept of the court systems in the US.
  • Discuss the history of American corrections.
  • Describe and discuss the differences between jails and prisons.
  • Identify, explain, and critique the four justifications for punishment.
  • Compare and contrast the adult and juvenile justice systems in America.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

CRJU 2200 - Introduction to Law Enforecment

This course is required for students majoring in criminal justice. This is a study of the philosophy and history of law enforcement at the federal, state, county and city levels. It is designed to expose students to the characteristics and operational missions of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Special emphasis will be placed on historical influences and conflicting roles with which the profession has struggled. Students become familiar with policing goals, contemporary police organizations and methods of operations, police culture and approaches to community police and problem oriented policing.

Offered: Fall

CRJU 2205 - Introduction to Criminal Law

Development of substantive criminal law. Crimes against persons, property and public order. Criminal procedure, constitutional basis, speech, assembly, arrest, search, self-incrimination and right to counsel, due process, and civil rights.

Co-requisite: None

Prerequisites: Satisfactory English cores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

Offered: Spring

CRJU 2210 - Intro-to Criminal Law & Procedures

This course includes an historical overview of criminal procedure including criminal procedure and common law. The Constitution’s impact on criminal procedure and the impact of the Supreme Court are included in the overview. Probable cause and the requirements of search warrants and central issues. Arrests, illegal seizures, the exclusionary rule and the appeals process are examined.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.

CRJU 2215 - Introduction to Criminology

Nature, distribution and characteristics of crime and the criminal; major theories of crime causation.

Co-requisite: None

Prerequisites: Satisfactory English cores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

Offered: Spring

CRJU 2230 - Introduction to Corrections

Development of modern correctional thinking; characteristics of the correctional institution and the inmate; correctional methods in the institution and the community; the future of corrections.

Co-requisite: None

Prerequisites: Satisfactory English cores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

Offered: Fall

CRJU 2400 - Report Writing and Research

This course is designed as a departmental effort to improve the writing skills of criminal justice majors, including technical and agency requirements in properly formatting reports. Students will utilize library resources, compiling bibliographies and abstracting articles.

Offered: Fall, Spring

CRJU 2800 - American Corrections

This is an interdisciplinary overview of the American Correctional System. Corrections refer to the sentencing, imprisonment and treatment of offenders coming to the attention of officials in criminal justice. Topics include the history of the American Prison System; research conducted on the inmate subculture, structure and of corrections, case law on prisoner rights litigation and community based corrections.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.

CRJU 2900 - Criminology

Criminology is the study of the amount of crime in society theories of crime causation and the origins of criminal law. Elements of corpus delicate and the different methods of measuring crime are considered. The focus of the course is on the major schools of criminology: classical school, positive school and critical school. Empirical research studies within each school will be reviewed.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.

CRJU 2910 - Org and Admin of CRJU

This course provided an analysis of the basic principles of administration and management as they apply to criminal justice agencies. Emphasis is placed on theories of bureaucracy, exercise of power planning and models of decision making. Principles of organization are applied to police, courts and corrections.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.

CRJU 3000 - Global Terrorism

This course will focus on worldwide terrorism as an evolving phenomenon, from both historical and contemporary viewpoints. Students will derive their own definitions of what constitutes "terrorism." and terrorists" from a wide-ranging study of the groups and individuals associated with politicized action by force and violence. In doing so, the class will attempt to arrive at a consensus regarding the effects of terrorism and the responses to it, both by governments and by citizens at large. Terrorist methods, weapons, and tactics will be examined as they relate to overall strategies and goals, and current trends will be examined in detail. Finally, each student in which past and current terror events will be reviewed and analyzed, and a forecast will be prepared (and defended of what may be expected in the future.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.

Offered: Spring

CRJU 3200 - Survey of Juvenile Justice Sys

This course deals with ways to stem the juvenile crime trends, while simultaneously balancing constitutional and other legal issues, confront our society. Our juvenile justice system has sought to address the problem that involves the constitutional and fair processing of children and youth who violate the law. This course is designed to address these issues.

Prerequisite: CRJU 2600.

CRJU 3300 - Comp Inter legal System

This course, although designed specifically for a Student Study Abroad Program, can also be offered in-residence at Albany State University. The course seeks to enhance the student's knowledge of legal theories and practices in selected countries throughout the world. It includes comparisons of different countries and their systems for responding to various legal issues and dilemmas with an emphasis on various law enforcement structures and strategies, court systems, and correctional systems. Offered: Summer

CRJU 3410 - Criminal Justice Research

This is a survey course on the methods/procedures of conducting social science research. Empirical methods utilized in sociology, psychology, economics, journalism are reviewed, sampling techniques and various approaches to hypothesis testing are emphasized.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2400or CRJU 2900.

CRJU 3420 - Research Statistics

This is a survey of descriptive and inferential statistics used in Criminal Justice research. Applications of parametric and nonparametric methods of hypothesis testing constitute the emphasis of the course. Measures of central tendency and dispersion are related to inferences to population parameters. Pearson’s Product Moment correlation, regression, analysis of variance and other tests of sample means are reviewed.

Prerequisite: CRJU 3410 and CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2400.

CRJU 3530 - CRJU Ethics and Professionals

No field of professional employment is more strewn with ethical considerations than the area of criminal justice. As students leave to join the work force they must be prepared to act professionally and ethically in any number intense situations. Further, students will be exposed to concepts and ethical points are critical to the success of their professional careers. Students will leave this with an increased awareness and concern for ethical issues in criminal justice, and a firm understanding of the importance of professionalism in their efforts for career advancement. Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2400

CRJU 4210 - Philosophy of Law & Punishment

This course exposes students to the various philosophies that laws and systems of punishment are based on today. The history of law in society is reviewed. Due process and Crime Control philosophies are compared and contrasted. Each philosophy is applied to the various stages of criminal justice processing: arrest, trail, appeals and corrections. Various works of key philosophers in the field will be presented and discussed.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2900.

Offered: As Needed

CRJU 4520 - Drugs and Crime

Chemical dependency is correlated to a number of societal problems including crime, poverty, and unemployment. This course estimates the prevalence of drug use, types and amounts of drugs on the market, relationship between drug use and crime and various explanations of this relationship. Stages of drug dependency are reviewed. Demand and supply side approaches to the war on drugs are compared and contrasted. Demand and supply side approaches include drug testing, drug treatment programs, and other prevention activities.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2900.

Offered: Summer

CRJU 4650 - Special Topics

This course will allow students to participate in specialized classes on a variety of topics. These topics will be presented by visiting scholars, faculty completing research in specialized areas, faculty returning from sabbaticals, and exchange from other faculty from other institutions and countries. Examples of the types of courses that will be offered in CRJU 4620 are as follows: International Crime, Crime and the African American Experience, German Criminal Justice System, Computers and Crime. This course is designed to allow student’s access to the most current and diverse subject matter available to the department on a continuing basis. Course syllabi will vary from course to course.

Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2400.

Offered: Summer

CRJU 5100 - Foundations of Criminal Justice

A survey of the total criminal justice system including crime causation, police, courts, corrections, and juvenile delinquency, private security, research and planning.

CRJU 5110 - Theory & Philosophy of CJ

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, and practices of the criminal justice system. The course will provide an introduction to major theories of the policy making process, examines methods of policy analysis, and apply these methods to the study of contemporary criminal justice issues. Emphasis will be placed on professional ethics, the nature of law and punishment, the overview of the criminal justice system; law enforcement; court system; and how criminal justice problems are conceptualized and brought to the attention of policymakers, how policy unfolds, and how these responses are implemented, evaluated and revised overtime.

CRJU 5400 - Organization & Administration

A study of theories of bureaucracy, the exercise of power, and the functional relations between police, courts, and corrections.

CRJU 5600 - Research Methods

A study of theory construction, hypothesis development, operationalization, and modes of data collection

CRJU 5610 - Research Statistics

An examination of parametric and non-parametric statistical methods, inferential statistics, tests of significance, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: CRJU 5600

CRJU 6000 - Survey of Policing & Law

This course provides a comprehensive and advanced overview of the law enforcement systems in the United States focusing on local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. The course will examine divergent philosophies, models and various operational systems of law enforcement agencies and allows students to gain a deeper understanding of law enforcement practices, duties, and responsibilities encountered as engaged by law enforcement professionals at various levels of operations. The course will also focus on the overlapping functions, conflicts and contradictions as well as some ethical issues and dilemmas associated with law enforcement practices and operations.

CRJU 6100 - Policing in a Democratic Society

A study of the conflict between individual liberty and social control agencies, public acceptance of the order maintenance function of the police, the pros and cons of present limitations on police authority.

CRJU 6110 - The Social Service Role of Criminal Justice Personnel

A study of the officer’s role in the field of social service to the community. Topics covered are human relations, social dynamics and crisis management. Police responsibilities to the elderly, juveniles and the mentally disturbed are stressed.

CRJU 6120 - Law Enforcement Operations

An examination of law enforcement responsibilities and the allocations of resources to meet the role. Topics covered include managing criminal investigations, patrol operations, crime prevention, mass media relations and criminal court procedures.

CRJU 6200 - Law Enforcement Managment & Planning

This course focuses on the implementation of criminal justice policies, planning, criminal justice management, decision-making and communications as basic management activities, budgetary processes and personnel management.

CRJU 6400 - Foundations of Corrections

A survey of the history of punishment, prisons and penology in America. The social, intellectual and institutional environment in which corrections evolved is discussed. Analysis of the punishment experience as see by prison officials and offenders.

CRJU 6410 - Administration of Psychological Test

Supervised training in the administration, scoring and interpretation of tests of intelligence, aptitude, interest and personality. Prerequisite: CRJU 5600 and CRJU 5610;

CRJU 6420 - Interviewing & Counseling

An examination of the purpose and principles of effective interviewing. Analysis of individual problems and the process of problem-solving with criminal justice clients. Emphasis is placed on learning experiences to help unmotivated, involuntary clients.

CRJU 6430 - Rehabilitation & Treatment

Development of frame of reference for rational treatment of offenders through description, examination and practice of treatment methods. Analysis of methods employed by correctional institutions to prepare inmates for reintegration into their environment upon release is also included.

CRJU 6440 - Management of Correctional Institutions

An analysis of the organization and management of various types of correctional facilities. Focus is on personnel selection and training, legal and administrative requirements, security, maintenance, program implementation and staffing.

CRJU 7001 - Thesis Seminar

The purpose of the thesis is to apply theories and techniques to relevant questions in the discipline of criminal justice. Students should pose the research question in the context of the police, the courts or corrections. The thesis topic must be approved and evaluated by the advisor.

CRJU 7002 - Thesis

This course includes the analysis of data collected from appropriate research designs including computer analysis and appropriate statistical tests of significance, or a review of literature and theories or concepts that lend themselves to a thesis topic.

CRJU 7003 - Technolgoy and Criminal Justice

This course familiarizes graduate students with the various uses of technology in the criminal justice system and raises ethical and legal issues with its use. Students in the non-thesis option may substitute MGMT 6205 Management Information Systems or PADM 6011 Computer Application for Public Administration.

CRJU 7004 - CRJ Program Evaluation

This Course is designed to familiarize students with techniques that are utilized in evaluating the effectiveness of public programs and polices. The course is appropriate for all non-thesis graduate students. Students may substitute PADM 5823 Public Program Evaluation for the course.

CSCI 1150 - Computer Programming in Visual Basic

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: MATH 1001 or MATH 1111 or consent of Division Chair.

This is a course which presents the fundamentals of programming with Visual Basic. Topics covered will include problem solving, program development, data types, subroutines, control structures for selection and loops, file processing, arrays, functions, strings and graphics.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers, computer applications, and troubleshooting

Additional Requirements:

  • No proctored exams required.

CSCI 1300 - Introduction to Computer Science

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: MATH 1001 or MATH 1111 or consent of Division Chair.

This course provides a foundation in major computing topics such as (but not limited to) computer architecture and operating systems, networks including the Internet, numbering systems, data representation, file structures, and software engineering. An introduction to systems analysis, design, and implementation is included via hands-on programming projects.

Students who successfully complete CSCI 1300 will be able to:

  • Identify the historical/mathematical foundations of computing.
  • Explain the role of binary and hexadecimal numbering systems in data representation.
  • Describe the components of a computer architecture and how they work together.
  • Describe the roles of the operating system and the file management system.
  • Describe the function of database systems and identify multiple examples.
  • Describe the components of a computer network and how they work together.
  • Present the history of the Internet and Web to include major protocols such as TCP/IP, SMTP, FTP, and HTTP.
  • Identify contemporary issues in computer security and ethics.
  • Identify the common syntax components that apply to all programming languages.
  • Differentiate between machine language, assembly language, high-level language, and object-oriented language.
  • Implement a complete software engineering life-cycle:
    • Prepare a systems analysis document based on a case study.
    • Prepare a design plan based on a systems analysis document.
    • Write, debug, and test computer programs based on a design plan.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers, computer applications, and troubleshooting.
  • A computer able to support Microsoft Visual Studio (a student edition at no cost). Students will need to install Microsoft Visual Studio using instructions provided early in the course.

Additional Requirements:

CSCI 1301 - Computer Science I

Credits: 4

Prerequisites: CSCI 1201

This course is an overview of computers and programming; problem- solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logical operators; selection structures; text files; arrays; procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming. A high level programming language (currently Java) will be used.

Students who successfully complete CSCI 1301 are expected to be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of inheritance, polymorphism, and encapsulation.
  • Demonstrate advanced concepts for manipulating Strings.
  • Understand and demonstrate the use of Exception Handling.
  • Use recursion and understand the benefits and pitfalls related to it.
  • Understand the concept of Generics.
  • Use the Collections Framework to solve problems.
  • Work and demonstrate knowledge of dynamic data structures.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of different sorting methods.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-to-advanced knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • A computer able to support NetBeans (under the GNU General Public License – at no cost). Students will need to install NetBeans using instructions provided early in the course.
  • NOTE: The current textbook includes a one-use-only access code to use online resources such as VideoNotes, the author's Companion Web Site, and LiveLab. If your copy of the textbook does not include this code, or if it has previously been used, a code is available separately from the publisher’s site for a fee.
  • Starting Fall 2015, students will also need an access code for myProgrammingLab. If a copy of the textbook does not include this code or if it has previously been used, a code is available separately from the publisher’s site for a fee.

Additional Requirements:

CSCI 1302 - Computer Science II

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 or consent of Division Chair

This course is an overview of abstract data types; multi-dimensional arrays and records; sets and strings; binary searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis; recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures. A high level programming (currently JAVA) will be used.

Students who successfully complete CSCI 1302 are expected to be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of concepts of Object-Oriented programming, including inheritance, polymorphism, and encapsulation.
  • Demonstrate advanced concepts for manipulating Strings.
  • Understand and demonstrate the use of Exception Handling.
  • Use recursion and understand the benefits and pitfalls related to it.
  • Understand the concept of Generics.
  • Use the Collections Framework to solve problems.
  • Work and demonstrate knowledge of dynamic data structures.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of different sorting methods.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

CSCI 2200 - Internet Technologies

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: Completion or exemption from all learning support requirements.

CSCI 2200 provides a comprehensive introduction to the tools and skills required for both client and server-side programming, teaching students how to develop platform-independent sites using current Web development technology. Essential programming exercises are presented using a manageable progression.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Write the code for and display a web page in a variety of web browsers using proper syntax.
  • Write the code for multiple web pages linked together to form a web site.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of HTML page design using tables, frames, and Cascading Style Sheets.
  • Build an interactive web form using JavaScript.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of adding multimedia to web pages.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of ASP.NET and other web technologies.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of client- and server-side programming.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes, Exams, and Assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers, computer applications, and troubleshooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Excel appropriately configured to run GeorgiaView (see https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click online courses and then System Checker)
  • No proctored exams required.

CSCI 2500 - Discrete Structures

This course provides a brief introduction to mathematical logic and typical proof methods, followed by a discussion of set, functions, and relations. The course also focuses on the mathematical techniques that are frequently used in computer science like counting techniques, elementary probability theory, combinatorics, recurrence relations, and asymptotic notation.

Students who complete CSCI 2500 should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic mathematical concepts such as sets, relations, functions, and graphs, relationships between them and their properties.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of logical expressions and basic algebraic tools.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of different types of trees and the methods used for building and searching them.
  4. Have the ability to reason correctly.
  5. Use techniques for solving problems.
  6. Have the ability to extrapolate.
  7. Be proficient in using mathematical notations (both in reading and writing).

Course Requirements:

Prerequisite: MATH 1113, MATH 2411 or MATH 1151.

Corequisites: None.

Offered: On demand

Proctored Tests – This course requires 3 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

CTCP 2100 - Introduction to Computed Tomography

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Registered Radiologic Technologist, Nuclear Medicine Technologist, or a Radiation Therapy Technologist with the ARRT or Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Corequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, or Radiation Therapy Program.

This course serves as an introduction to computed tomography with an emphasis on basic patient care while in a Computed Tomography department, as well as the history of CT and the components of a CT scanner. Additional topics include patient history, vital signs, laboratory values, contrast agents (oral and intravenous) medical ethics, patient confidentiality, as well as research contributors in CT, historical events, scanner generations, characteristics of radiation, detectors and data acquisition system.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

CTCP 2110 - Physical Principle, Instrumentation, and Quality Control

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: CTCP 2100 and Registered Radiologic Technologist, Nuclear Medicine Technologist, or a Radiation Therapy Technologist with the ARRT or Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Corequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, or Radiation Therapy Program.

This course is an overview of the system operation, components, and quality control. To be able to understand the different functions and capabilities and identify the components of the CT scanner and to provide quality care during a CT examination. Topics include data acquisition, data processing, reconstruction, manipulation, image quality, console, high voltage generator, filter, detectors and convolution, interpolation, and pitch.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

CTCP 2120 - Sectional Anatomy I

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CTCP 2110 and Registered Radiologic Technologist, Nuclear Medicine Technologist, or a Radiation Therapy Technologist with the ARRT or Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Corequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, or Radiation Therapy Program.

This is an overview of cross-sectional anatomy that is imaged during a Computed Tomography examination. This course will provide information about normal head, spine, and chest anatomy. Students will be able to identify, and recall normal anatomical structures on cross-sectional images in order to perform quality care for patients. Topics include the circle of Willis, gray/white matter, pons, vertebral body, lamina, spinous process, spinal cord, heart (ventricle/atrium), lungs, and ribs.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

CTCP 2130 - Sectional Anatomy II

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CTCP 2120 and Registered Radiologic Technologist, Nuclear Medicine Technologist, or a Radiation Therapy Technologist with the ARRT or Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Corequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, or Radiation Therapy Program.

This is an overview of cross-sectional anatomy that is imaged during a Computed Tomography examination. This course will provide basic information about normal neck. abdomen, pelvis, and extremities anatomy. Students will be able to identify, and recall normal anatomical structures on cross-sectional images in order to perform quality care for patients. Topics include the liver, aorta, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, ureters, pelvic girdle, sma, celiac artery, femoral arteries, popliteal arteries, and bony structures such as the ribs, femur, humerus, ankle, and shoulder.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

CTCP 2140 - Clinical Applications I

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: CTCP 2130 and Registered Radiologic Technologist, Nuclear Medicine Technologist, or a Radiation Therapy Technologist with the ARRT or Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Corequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, or Radiation Therapy Program.

This course introduces students to the clinical setting of a Computed Tomography (CT) department. It allows students to observe and gain knowledge of CT procedures as well as patient care while in the CT department. Introduces the student to the CT scanner, protocols, equipment used, contrast agents, as well as starting to work toward their clinical competencies needed for this course and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Allied Health Background Check: $49.50
  • Computed Tomography Insurance Fee: $17.50

Additional Requirements:

CTCP 2150 - Clinical Applications II

Credits: 5 Prerequisite: CTCP 2140 and Registered Radiologic Technologist, Nuclear Medicine Technologist, or a Radiation Therapy Technologist with the ARRT or Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Corequisite: Graduation from an accredited Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, or Radiation Therapy Program.

This course is a continuation of the hands-on training about the CT scanner, protocols, equipment, contrast agents, as well as post-processing that was introduced in the previous clinical course. It allows students to become more proficient as well as gaining work experience needed to join the workforces an entry-level technologist and towards the completion of their clinical competencies needed for this course as well as the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications.

Additional Requirements

ECEC 5500 - Early Childhood Development

Advanced course in the physical, emotional, social and intellectual development of infants and young children through nine years of age and in observations of children in this age period for the purpose of applying principles and plotting developmental changes. Observation-laboratory experiences will be included to reflect on those observations. Candidates must earn a minimum grade of B to receive credit for this course in the program of study.

ECEC 5509 - Theories, Design & Program Development in Early Childhood

Provides for the analysis and evaluation of the needs of both student and teacher in differentiated learning environments in the preschool primary grades in early childhood education. Curricula design will address varied philosophies, theories and methods of teaching and supporting auxiliaries. Candidates must earn a minimum grade of B to receive credit for this course in the program of study.

ECEC 5512 - Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood Education

Educational programs for young children with varied cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Opportunities will be provided for analysis and evaluation of these programs through selected field experiences and action research. Candidates must earn a minimum grade of B to receive credit for this course in the program of study.

ECEC 5518 - Issues in Early Childhood Education

This course will focus on current research trends and issues, historical, philosophical and sociological influences that have shaped early childhood education. Controversial issues and alternative approaches to solve problems will be investigated.

ECEC 5525 - Math Experiences for Young Children

Theoretical viewpoints that have affected the teaching pre-mathematical and math concepts will be will be examined. Innovative mathematics projects and programs will be reviewed. Laboratory experiences will be arranged. Candidates must earn a minimum grade of B to receive credit for this course in the program of study .

ECEC 5527 - Science Experiences for Young Children

Theoretical viewpoints which have affected the teaching of science concepts will be reviewed. Curriculum, method, materials and technologies will be analyzed and evaluated in view of current research and practices. Candidates must earn a minimum grade of B to receive credit for this course in the program of study.

ECEC 5550 - Social Studies in Early Childhood Education

This course will examine innovative techniques for teaching of social studies. Curriculum, methods and techniques will be analyzed and evaluated in view of current research and practices. Field experiences to include field-testing social studies projects will be required. Candidates must earn a minimum grade of B to receive credit for this course in the program of study.

ECEC 5555 - Creative Experiences in Early Childhood Education

Emphasizes a team teaching approach to the study of the creative process by use of selected topics of creative experiences in the living and learning of children. Candidates must earn a minimum grade of B to receive credit for this course in the program of study.

ECON 2105 - Principles of Macroeconomics

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: MATH 1111

Introduces students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies.

Students who successfully complete ECON 2105 will be able to:

  • Identify and apply the concepts of supply, demand, and price determination.
  • Recognize and differentiate the impact of public and private sector decisions on the economy.
  • Analyze the components of Gross Domestic Product accounts and discuss their applications to everyday life.
  • Define business cycles, unemployment, and inflation and relate them to the growth of the U.S. economy.
  • Investigate the relationship between productivity and standard living.
  • Study the impact of government spending and tax policies on the rate of economic growth.
  • Identify the functions of the Federal Reserve System and calculate their impact on the nation’s money supply.
  • Relate various macroeconomic theories to “real world” outcomes in our economic life
  • Analyze the impact of different exchange rate systems on the world economy.
  • Analyze the effect of trade deficits on the economy.
  • Understand the workings of our financial system and how managers use the tools of finance to make decisions.
  • Understand the components of aggregate demand and supply and how these concepts can be used to explain growth and recessions.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Proctored Tests –
    Instructor YATES: Proctored Tests – this course requires any make up tests to be proctored. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.
  • Instructor JOHNSON: - Proctored Tests – This course requires 1 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

ECON 2106 - Principles of Microeconomics

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: MATH 1111

Introduces students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy.

Students who successfully complete ECON 2106 will be able to:

  • Identify and apply the concepts of supply, demand, and elasticity.
  • Analyze the government policies of price controls, taxes and their consequences to the firm and consumer.
  • Discuss the intended and unintended results of government policies and the economics of the public sector.
  • Gain knowledge of the economics of labor markets with regard to factors of production; income inequalities and poverty; and the determinants of the supply and demand for various types of labor.
  • Understand the impact of various tax systems on decision making.
  • List the conditions which characterize a competitive market and analyze profit maximization on the competitive firm’s supply curve.
  • Examine the production and pricing decisions of a monopolistically competitive markets and oligopolies.
  • Understand and classify the costs that firms experience when producing goods and services.
  • Understand how the theory of consumer choice explains the decisions consumers make in the everyday lives in terms of price and quality demanded.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Instructor YATES: Proctored Tests – this course requires any make up tests to be proctored. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Instructor JOHNSON: Proctored Tests – This course requires 1 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

ECON 2201 - Survey of Economics

Prerequisite: MATH 1001 or higher and satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the basic operations of the United States economy and designed for students who desire a one-term course in the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, and their applications to real-world economic issues.

ECON 3205 - Economics and Business Statistics

Prerequisite: MATH 1113, ECON 2105, and ECON 2106

Credits: 3

The application of statistical techniques to economic and business problems. Topics include descriptive statistics, introduction to probability theory, confidence internal estimation and hypothesis testing, sampling techniques, and business forecasting.

ECON 6106 - Economics for Mangers

This course is an overview of basic economic theory applied to modern business decision making. It will cover major macroeconomics and microeconomic concepts that are important to managers working in the American economy. This course is designed to develop student's understanding of how to efficiently achieve the goals of the firm and their ability to recognize how economic forces affect the organization. Prerequisite: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 or ECON 5200 Offered: Spring.

EDRG 5594 - Introduction to Theory & Pedagogy in Reading

This course is designed to provide an overview of foundational knowledge for reading instruction and practical, technological, and theoretical information about the reading and writing processes needed to instruct diverse populations are covered. Current research in the field of reading education is included to equip the teacher with a balanced perspective.

EDRG 5595 - Diagnosis & Prescriptive Procedures in Rdg

Focuses on using assessment tools to plan, evaluate, and revise effective instruction to meet the needs of all learners.

EDRG 5596 - Content Area Literacy

Focuses on instructional strategies of literacy skills teachers can use to help learners transfer skills in specific content areas.

EDUC 2110 - Invest Critical/Contemporary Issues

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 or ENGL 1101E or ENGL 1101A

This course engages students in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy.

Students who successfully complete EDUC 2110 will be able to:

  • Investigate and describe contemporary schools and the interplay of school and society via selected social, historical, political, economic, philosophical, and cultural issues that influence those schools.
  • Discover, explore, and describe current issues and trends in schools using disciplinary and interdisciplinary fields and the lens of analysis, critique, and interpretation.
  • Analyze their legal, ethical, and professional responsibilities as future teachers.
  • Explore their core values and reflect on how their values influence their beliefs about “good” teaching and schooling in democratic contexts.
  • Develop and refine a philosophy of teaching for contemporary schools by exploring who they are as a potential teacher and what dispositions they have for teaching diverse students in current GA and US school contexts.
  • Analyze the implications, benefits, and challenges concerning the use of technology in contemporary GA and US classrooms.

Course Requirements:

  • Documentation of 10 hours of classroom observation in a classroom
  • Completion of a portfolio
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • This course requires the completion of 10 hours of field experience, which is obtained through classroom observation of state-certified teachers during the semester the course is taken.

Additional Requirements:

EDUC 2120 - Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspective

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: EDUC 2110

Given the rapidly changing demographics in our state and country this course is designed to equip future teachers with the fundamental knowledge of understanding culture and teaching children from diverse backgrounds. Specifically, this course is designed to examine 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definitions and implications of diversity, and 4) the influences of culture on learning, development, and pedagogy.

Students who successfully complete EDUC 2120 will be able to:

  • Identify how history and culture shape world views
  • Recognize the development of his/her own cultural identity and learning styles
  • Compare and contrast differences related to family structure, socioeconomic status, abilities/disabilities and culture.
  • Identify school practices and policies that perpetuate and maintain achievement gaps, including negative stereotypes, related to race, class, persons with disabilities, gender, sexual orientation, and other forms of prejudice and discrimination.
  • Identify strategies that creatively deal with challenges and differences between the cultures of educators and students.
  • Identify assets and values of diverse populations to bring student learning to higher levels.

Course Requirements:

  • Documentation of 10 hours of classroom observation in a classroom
  • Completion of a portfolio
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • This course requires the completion of 10 hours of field experience, which is obtained through classroom observation of state-certified teachers during the semester the course is taken.

Additional Requirements:

EDUC 2130 - Exploring Teaching and Learning

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: EDUC 2120

This course is designed to explore some of the principle theories of learning and teaching. Students will examine their own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying that knowledge toward enhancing the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts.

Students who successfully complete EDUC 2130 will be able to:

  • Apply learning theories to classroom situations
  • Examine the importance of the psychology of the individual to the development of self-esteem, cooperative learning, individual differences, motivation and learning styles.
  • Describe the relationships of teachers, parents, and students that lead to a productive learning environment.
  • Articulate their beliefs about education and the role of educational psychology.

Course Requirements:

  • Documentation of 10 hours of classroom observation in a classroom
  • Create a portfolio
  • Participate in discussion questions
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

EDUC 5000 - Professional Development for Accomplished Teachers

This course focuses on the self-assessment of individual student understanding and application of mastery outcomes based on National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Emphasis will be upon preparing educators to assess their practice using the rigorous guidelines for the NBTS process.

EDUC 5199 - Introduction Teacher Education

Orientation to Teacher Education provides graduate students with the training and information needed to successfully navigate ASU teacher preparation program requirements. Students will receive training on the College of Education's Conceptual Framework; the requirements needed to successfully complete teacher preparation programs; learn to navigate DegreeWorks to complete academic program plans of study; and learn to navigate LiveText for purposes of assessment and evaluation of Key Unit and Program specific assessments. All students will be required to purchase a LiveText account and have an active ASU account prior to participation in the course.

EDUC 5500 - Educational Statistics (Prerequisite for EDUC 5502)

Application of basic descriptive statistics to education. Data graphs and tables, probability, sampling statistics, correlation and hypothesis testing are studied.

EDUC 5502 - Action/Classroom Research

A study of research methods, procedures and designs, including the preparation of research abstracts and action research as it applies to educational settings.

EDUC 5504 - History of American Education

A survey of major developments in the rise of public school in the U.S. from the colonial period to the present.

EDUC 5509 - Philosophy of Education

A study of the basic tenets of education focusing on current issues and their basic assumptions in schools. The derivations of issues and practices are analyzed.

EDUC 5538 - Curriculum Principles

Models for curriculum development and the forces that bear on curriculum decision making will be studied. This is the basic course in principles of curriculum development for graduate students, including those from diverse backgrounds with a variety of career goals.

EDUC 5540 - Curriculum Principles

Models for curriculum development and the forces that bear on curriculum decision making will be studied. This is the basic course in principles of curriculum development for graduate students, including those from diverse backgrounds with a variety of career goals.

EMTP 1121 - Essential Math for the Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Provider

EMTP 1121 includes material covered in the EMT-Paramedic, National Standard Curriculum Preparatory Module, Venous Access and Medication Administration section. The course includes a basic review of mathematical principles including fractions, decimals, and percentages. Various systems of measure including metric, household, and apothecary are included. Drug calculations which involve moving within and between the various systems of measure are included. Problem solving of drug calculations using ratio and proportion is stressed. Units on computation of drug dosages with one unknown, calculation of drug dosages based on patient weights, calculation of IV drug drips, and calculation of IV drug drips based on patient weights are part of the course. Students must be able to convert patient weights from pounds to kilograms.

ENGL 0989 - Foundations for English Composition

Foundations for English Composition, prepares students for college-level reading and writing. Students will build competency in recognizing, comprehending, and using appropriate grammar, vocabulary, punctuation, and structure in sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Skill development will be individualized through the use of diagnostic tools. In addition, students will be required to read selections, compose responses and writing assignments, and revise assignments as recommended.

Exit Requirements: C or higher.

OUTCOMES: At the end of this course, students will be able to

  1. Read and comprehend prose texts in a variety of non-fiction genres.
  2. Apply effective reading processes for improved comprehension skills expected of students entering ENGL 1101.
  3. Apply effective writing processes for improved composing skills expected of students entering ENGL 1101.
  4. Identify the meaning of words by using context clues.
  5. Recognize main ideas and supporting details in reading and writing.
  6. Recognize implied conclusions, generalizations, summaries of ideas and relationships among ideas.
  7. Recognize an author's beliefs and assumptions about a subject.
  8. Identify common structural elements and patterns in sentences, paragraphs, and essays.
  9. Generate short prose compositions using conventions of edited American English regarding grammar, usage, punctuation, capitalization and spelling.

ENGL 0999 - Support for English Composition

Credits: 2 Pre-requisite: ENGL 0989, or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher. Co-requisite: ENGL 1101

ENGL 0999, Support for English Composition, assists students with college-level reading, research, and writing required in ENGL 1101. In addition to supporting work completed for ENGL 1101, students will also review basic principles of English fundamentals and usage through individualized assignments.

Additional Requirements:

ENGL 1101 - English Composition I

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: Satisfactory scores on the Writing and Reading placement examinations or completion of ENGL 0989 with grades of “C” or better.

English Composition I focuses on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation. The course also includes introductory use of a variety of research skills. The course is designed to teach the mechanics of expression and the development and organization of ideas into paragraphs and essays. Students who successfully complete ENGL 1101 will be able to:

  • Apply thinking processes to composition
  • Demonstrate competence in writing personal, informative, and persuasive essays
  • Collect and synthesize material for essays
  • Employ various basic research skills
  • Express clarity of style, content, and grammar in writing timed essays on unannounced topics

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, essays, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

ENGL 1102 - English Composition II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1101 with a grade of “C” or better.

This is a composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101, emphasizes a variety of more advanced research methods and an interpretation and evaluation of sources. Exit Requirements: C or higher. Pre-requisite: ENGL 1101. Students who successfully complete ENGL 1102 will be able to:

  • Apply thinking processes to composition
  • Demonstrate competence in writing personal, informative, and persuasive essays
  • Collect and synthesize material for essays
  • Employ various research skills
  • Express clarity of style, content, and grammar in writing timed essays on unannounced topics

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, essays, and tests
  • Essay
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

ENGL 2111 - World Literature I

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of “C” or better

A survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century. Students who successfully complete ENGL 2111 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of works, authors, and trends of major importance in world literature from mid- seventeenth century to the present
  • Identify the characteristics of the different literary periods
  • Determine the similarities and differences between Western culture and those of other countries in the modern world
  • Recognize the cultural significance of Western literary heritage and the common concerns of humanity as expressed through literature

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Essay
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

ENGL 2112 - World Literature II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of “C” or better

A survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. Students who successfully complete ENGL 2112 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of works, authors, and trends of major importance in world literature from mid- seventeenth century to the present
  • Identify the characteristics of the different literary periods
  • Determine the similarities and differences between Western culture and those of other countries in the modern world
  • Recognize the cultural significance of Western literary heritage and the common concerns of humanity as expressed through literature

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Essay – one long or two short
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

ENGL 2121 - British Literature I

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102

A general survey of the works in British literature from the beginning through the Restoration period.

ENGL 2122 - British Literature II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of “C” or better

A general survey of the works in British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students who successfully complete ENGL 2122 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of works, authors, and trends of major importance in world literature from mid- seventeenth century to the present
  • Identify the characteristics of the different literary periods
  • Determine the similarities and differences between Western culture and those of other countries in the modern world
  • Recognize the cultural significance of Western literary heritage and the common concerns of humanity as expressed through literature

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Essay
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • A dictionary, thesaurus, and recent MLA handbook are strongly encouraged

ENGL 2131 - American Literature I

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of “C” or better

This course is a survey of American literature from the pre-colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century. This course is not intended for English majors. Students who successfully complete ENGL 2131 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of works, authors, and trends of major importance in American literature from its beginnings through the middle of the nineteenth century
  • Identify the characteristics of the different literary periods
  • Determine the similarities and differences between Western culture and American culture through the middle of the nineteenth century
  • Recognize the cultural significance of Western literary heritage and the common concerns of humanity as expressed through literature

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Essay
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

ENGL 2132 - American Literature II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of “C” or better

This course is a survey of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. This course is not intended for English majors. Students who successfully complete ENGL 2132 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of works, authors, and trends of major importance in American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries
  • Identify the characteristics of the different literary periods
  • Determine the similarities and differences between Western culture and American culture through the middle of the nineteenth century
  • Recognize the cultural significance of Western literary heritage and the common concerns of humanity as expressed through literature

Course Requirements:

  • Online lectures, quizzes, reading assignments, and tests
  • Essay
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

ENGL 2210 - Creative Writing

Practical experience in imaginative writing, creating original works and developing style and voice through writing and criticism.

Exit requirements: A minimum of a "C" average on course work.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of "C" or better.

ENGL 2220 - Writing Non-Fiction

This course takes a somewhat more sophisticated look at composition than is possible in English Composition II. The course focuses on writing essays in clear, direct, graceful language that draws on grammar's potential for variety and interest. The course addresses the value of an enhanced vocabulary for creating these results. The course supplements its exercises in writing essays and articles with reading and analyzing works by prose masters from antiquity to our own period.

Exit requirements: A minimum of a "C" average on course work.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of "C" or better.

ENGL 2230 - Professional and Technical Writing

This course is an intermediate composition course that develops professional workplace communication skills. It emphasizes strategies, forms, and techniques of writing that aims to inform, persuade, or instruct. The course provides hands-on experience in writing and presenting business and technical documents produced by a variety of methods. It focuses on strategies used in marketing communication, public relations, and human resources and also includes experience with group collaboration.

Exit requirements: A minimum of a “C” average on course work.
Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1102 with a grade of "C" or better.

ENGL 3405 - Professional and Technical Writing - eMajor only

This course will introduce students to basic ethical and rhetorical concepts that govern a multitude of professional and technical situations. Highlighting the importance of the writing process, this course will concentrate on the fundamentals within professional writing communities in order to train students in effective and persuasive communication. Students will gain intensive practice in composing powerful audience-driven documents such as letters, memos, and job application materials, as well as instructions and formal reports. Covering a wide range of business principles- from gathering data through primary and secondary research to the planning and organizing of workplace genre sets­ this course provides practical advice regarding the professional standards that students will encounter in their future careers. Moreover, students will learn to craft effective presentations supported with appropriate documentary and visual aids as they collaborate on technical research and reporting projects with peers.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ENVS 2202 - Environmental Science

This course is an interdisciplinary course integrating principles from biology, chemistry, ecology, geology, and non-science disciplines as related to the interactions of humans and their environment. Issues of local, regional, and global concern will be used to help students explain scientific concepts and analyze practical solutions to complex environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on the study of ecosystems, human population growth, energy, pollution, and other environmental issues and important environmental regulations.

This is an eCore class - tuition is $169 per credit hour.

ESOL 5501 - Methods & Material of Teaching ESOL

Methods and Materials for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) aims to support candidates in studying, applying, and reflecting on knowledge of how language works and is learned; the relationship of culture to language learning and to learners’ adaptation to new schools and settings; ways of structuring curricula and instruction; and strategies for developing the classroom learning community and providing effective language teaching and learning.

ESOL 5502 - Instructional Strategies

This course is intended for both regular education and ESOL teachers and will focus on developing instructional strategies for supporting ESOL students in content area learning. Course participants will develop instructional and leadership skills needed for teaching ESOL. Participants will reflect upon using proven instructional practices to enhance learning in today’s challenging classroom environment.

ESOL 5503 - Applied Linguistics

Through this course, participants will become knowledgeable about the nature and structure of language and how first and second languages develop. Participants will explore language teaching strategies consistent with the current understanding of the nature, structure, and development of language. By developing a repertoire of effective strategies, participants will become more proficient at supporting students’ second language development. Teachers will investigate best practices and current research and consider how to adapt and integrate these principles into their own educational practice.

ESOL 5504 - Multicultural Education Issues

This course provides and in-depth discussion of the concept of culture and helps students/teachers/school personnel recognize the influence of culture on learning, communication, belief systems and value orientations, and patterns of thinking and behaving. Instructional applications including creating an appropriate learning environment and/or curriculum and materials for culturally diverse students will be given.

ETEC 1101 - Electronic Technology in the Educational Environment

This course is an introduction to using personal computers to communicate with individuals and groups and to locate, analyze, organize, and present information. Emphasis is on exploring the role of technology in present and future learning experiences. Topics include the digital divide, hardware, software, the internet and networks, privacy and security, and intellectual property in cyberspace. Students will use their practical technology skills to create formatted word-processed documents and an electronic presentation.

This is an eCore class - tuition is at $169 per credit hour.

FINC 3105 - Foundations of Financial Management

Prerequisite: ACCT 2101

Credits: 3

Techniques of financial analysis, including working capital management, capital budgeting dividend, and capital structure decisions.

FINC 6101 - Financial Management

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the functional concepts of the finance function with emphasize on the decision-making techniques relevant to financial and non-financial managers. Topics include valuation of future cash flows, capital budgeting, risk and return, cost of capital, and long-term financial policy. Offered: Spring.

FREN 1001 - Elementary French I

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 0989

Fundamental skills with emphasis on oral aspects of language learning and intensive and extensive use of structural patterns, dialog, oral drills and exercises. Language Laboratory required Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Greet, address, and take leave of others in culturally and socially appropriate ways
  • Exchange personal information
  • Request and identify nationality
  • Describe physical appearance personal attributes
  • Give and respond to compliments
  • Make, accept, and refuse offers
  • Express likes and dislikes
  • Identify and talk about family, friends and people and professions in the community
  • Share numerical information, including time and schedules
  • Fill gaps in a conversation
  • Recognize and discuss some of the benefits of proficiency in a second language
  • Compare and contrast some cultural features of the Francophone world with those of the US
  • Identify and discuss some of the contributions of French culture to the humanities and to world civilization
  • Use the internet to locate supplemental French resources

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, discussions, and oral recordings
  • Research project on assigned cultural topic related to Francophone history
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Proctored Tests – this course requires 2 proctored tests. Students living in the Albany area may test at the testing center at Albany State University – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

Additional Requirements:

FREN 1002 - Elementary French II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of FREN 1001. Fundamental skills with emphasis on oral aspects of language learning and intensive and extensive use of structural patterns, dialog, oral drills and exercises. Language Laboratory required. Students who successfully complete FREN 1002 will be able to:

  • Use common greetings and short descriptions of themselves, pastimes, seasons and weather, holidays, vacations, traveling, etc.
  • Address others appropriately with respect to social relationship and context.
  • Express agreement and disagreement.
  • Reproduce learned material in talking about the present and past.
  • Be able to make re-combinations of learned material.
  • Ask questions about classmates, their facilities, daily routine activities, pastimes, vacations, etc.
  • Demonstrate understanding of online instruction.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the “edited” messages used by the instructor even though not understanding every word.
  • Demonstrate understanding of classmates’ communication when supported by situation context.
  • Read and demonstrate understanding of simple texts that describe the Francophone world, family, daily life and special event activities.
  • Read and demonstrate understanding of directions in exams and online activities.
  • Write short paragraphs in the present and past about self, family members, school, leisure activities, holidays, and vacations. Sentences will be primarily re-combinations of already learned phrases but will begin to be placed in sequential order.
  • Compose a paragraph with internal structure and meaning.
  • Locate some French-speaking countries on a map and name the capital of each.
  • Discuss some fundamental cultural differences between France and the United States.
  • Recognize and discuss some of the benefits of proficiency in a second language.
  • Identify and discuss some of the contributions of French/Francophone culture to the humanities and to world civilization.
  • Relate given cultural features of the Francophone world with those of the United States
  • Locate and utilize supplemental resources on the Internet

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, discussions, and oral recordings
  • Proctored Tests – this course requires 2 proctored tests. Students living in the Albany area may test at the testing center at Albany State University – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.). Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

GEOG 1101 - Introduction to Human Geography

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 989 or satisfactory English scores placed into co-requisite remediation or higher

This course is an introductory survey of human geography with special attention to patterns of economic activities, natural resources and population problems. Students who successfully complete GEOG 1101 will possess:

  • An understanding of the basic principles of human geography – digging deeper than merely memorizing countries and their capitals
  • A greater understanding of the major realms and regions of the world
  • A greater understanding of the interrelationship between humans and their natural environment

Course Requirements:

  • Complete two written paper projects
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

GEOL 1011K - Introductory Geosciences I

This course covers Earth materials and processes. Geology 1011K is a 4 semester-credit-hour course, equivalent to an on-campus geology lecture course combined with a geology laboratory course. The course is delivered via GoVIEW to your computer. A few selected portions of the laboratory assignments need to be returned to the instructor by postal mail for grading. The course is designed for you to follow a weekly schedule and learn through readings, discussions, Lab assignments, quizzes, and exams.

This is an eCore course - tuition is $169 per credit hour.

HADM 3301 - Health Care Organizations - eMajor only

This project based course is intended for those interested in a systematic understanding of organizational principles, practices, and insights pertinent to the management of health service organizations. While based on state-of-the art organizational theory and research, the emphasis is on application. Students will go beyond the traditional focus of health care in hospitals and other provider organizations to include suppliers, buyers, regulators, public health and financing organizations, and examine a more comparative global perspective of how the United States and other countries address issues of health and health care. Case studies, practical scenarios, and controversial issues are highlighted in each chapter to challenge the student to provide solutions and philosophical positions on a variety of issues.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

HADM 3302 - Health Care Economics - eMajor only

This course is intended for those interested in an analytical approach to the study of medical services, and, through the use of numerous applications and figures, to illustrate the usefulness of economics as is applicable to the understanding of public policy issues affecting this sector.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

HADM 3303 - US Health Care Systems - eMajor Only

Fundamental concerns such as cost, access, quality, financing, health workforce, and public health represent key topics. We will apply these topics or problems to real-life situations. The approach will be purposeful to allow the successful student to recognize how these topics interact with each other within the whole health care system.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

HADM 3304 - Health Care Communication - eMajor Only

There is a growing awareness that communication not only affects but is inextricably linked with issues of health and medicine. This is true on a personal level in the way patients and caregivers interact in the examination and hospital room. It is also true on an organizational level in that policies and community relations affect the way health care is provided and the way people feel about providers. It is also evident in media campaigns that seek to educate people about health.

Prerequisites

  • ACED 2400, CS 1000, or consent of the instructor

Program of Study

  • Organizational Leadership
    Restricted

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

HADM 4301 - Healthcare Administration - eMajor Only

This project based course is intended for those interested in a systematic understanding of organizational theory and research, the emphasis is on application. Students will go beyond the traditional focus of health care in hospitals and other provider organizations to include suppliers, buyers, regulators, public health and financing organizations, and examine a more comparative global perspective of how the United States and other countries address issues of health and health care. Case studies, practical scenarios, and controversial issues are highlighted in each chapter to challenge the student to provide solutions and philosophical positions on a variety of issues.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

HADM 4401 - Health Care Compliance - eMajor Only

This course provides a comprehensive overview of health law, which his relevant to students seeking the basic management skills required to work in health care organizations, and students currently working in health care. The course will focus on an overview of specific health laws and affordable health care to producers of medical products and the future of health care in the US. The course concludes with a summary of improved medical technologies and the future of personalized health care.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

HADM 4402 - Health Information Management - eMajor Only

A study of recordkeeping practices in the hospital and physician’s office. Emphasis is placed on hospital and medical staff organization, patient record content, procedures in filling, numbering and retention of patient records, quantitative analysis, release of patient information, forms control and design, indexes and register, reimbursement, regulatory and accrediting agencies, and alternative health care delivery systems.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

HEDP 1161 - Human Sexuality Online

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

HEDP 1161 is an introductory course on Human Sexuality that reviews basic anatomy, sexual function and response, and challenges and disorders of sexual function. This course is designed to familiarize you with the biological, psychological, cultural, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality and family life. The course provides basic information about human sexuality which includes anatomy, pregnancy-childbirth, birth control, sexual variations, and sexually transmitted diseases. Students who successfully complete HEDP 1161 are expected to be able to understand:

  • Basic anatomical functions
  • The sexual response cycle
  • Sexual disorders
  • Pregnancy & childbirth
  • Birth control
  • Solitary and shared sexual behaviors
  • Homosexual behavior
  • The continuum of sexually transmitted diseases and their treatments
  • Sexual disorders which may be present for males and females
  • The challenges that may exist about sexuality and sexual function within special populations

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

HEDP 1163 - Personal Health

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

HEDP 1163 introduces the student to health problems and trends in modern health practices. Nutrition, heart disease, fitness, and consumer health protection are also discussed. Students who successfully complete HEDP 1163 are expected to be able to:

  • Increase knowledge of how to personalize one’s own health
  • Assess current personal lifestyle.
  • Identify the characteristics of emotional, mental, and spiritual health.
  • Define stress and stressors and describe how the body responds to stress according to the general adaption syndrome theory
  • Describe the components of physical fitness
  • Define overweight and obesity, and describe the four indicators of weight-related health risks.
  • Explain how the different agents of infection spread disease
  • Explain how heart functions
  • Identify the risk factors for cardiovascular disease that you can control and those that you cannot control
  • Discuss strategies for self-care, as well as how to get the best possible health care
  • List your rights as a medical consumer
  • Describe the different types of complementary and alternative therapies and explain what research has show about their effectiveness

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements:

HEDP 1164 - Stress Management

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

HEDP 1164 provides an introduction to various strategies that can be utilized by individuals and groups to counteract the effects of stress in their lives. The concepts of health promotion, disease prevention, self-care and healing provide the framework within which the student experiences the use of various stress management strategies. Students who successfully complete HEDP 1164 are expected to be able to:

  • Understand the biological and psychological symptoms of stress
  • Describe the importance of stress management and related emotional health approaches in adaptation, adjustment, and in achieving competence.
  • Describe the social, cognitive, and environmental factors related to learning.
  • Describe stress, the stress response, and the danger of prolonged distress.
  • Identify sources of stress in your own life and the lives of others across the age span.
  • Select and adopt various stress management techniques.
  • Gain experience with major forms of relaxation training techniques
  • Evaluate current research findings and applications of relaxation training in various settings.
  • Gain experience in applying stress management and relaxation training in your own life.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

HEDP 1165 - Mental Health

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None
Co requisite: None

Causes, types, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. Consideration given to society’s reaction to the mentally ill and how to maintain mental health. Students who complete HEDP 1165 should be able to:

  1. Explore time-management techniques and ways to enrich your life with positive experiences and attitudes
  2. Determine the reason for sleep.
  3. Identify the amount of sleep needed?
  4. Learn the symptoms and causes of insomnia.
  5. Define each of the four components of psychological health and identify the basic traits shared by psychologically healthy people.
  6. Learn what factors affect your psychological health; discuss the positive steps you can take to enhance your psychological well-being.
  7. Identify some psychological disorders, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and schizophrenia, and explain their causes and treatments.
  8. Discuss the warning signs of suicide and the actions you could take to help a suicidal individual.
  9. Explain the various treatments and different types of mental health professionals, explaining how they can play a role in managing mental health disorders
  10. Explain how spirituality and religion differ.
  11. Define how might psychotherapy be considered a form of spirituality?
  12. Define how your personal spirituality be enhanced based on what you have read?
  13. Discuss the various types of intentional injuries, and societal and individual factors that contribute to violence in American society.
  14. Discuss factors that contribute to homicide, domestic violence, sexual victimization, child and elder abuse, gang violence, and terrorism.
  15. Define aging and explain the related concepts of biological, psychological, social, legal, and functional age.
  16. Explain how the growing population of older adults will affect society, including considerations of economics, health care, living arrangements, and ethical and moral issues.
  17. Discuss death, the stages of the grieving process, and strategies for coping with death

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements

HEDP 1166 - Drugs and Drug Abuse

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

HEDP 1166 introduces the student to basic information about drug use and abuse which includes alcohol, depressants, narcotics, tobacco, stimulants, psychedelics, marijuana, over-the-counter drugs, and prescription drugs. Students who successfully complete HEDP 1166 are expected to be able to:

  • Identify and describe the various classifications of drugs
  • Define key drug terms
  • Describe the major methods for taking drugs
  • Explain how dose, age, body weight, gender, time, disease and emotional state affect drug actions
  • Identify how drugs get to and then affect the human brain
  • Explain the history of alcohol use
  • Compare the major classes of alcoholic beverages concerning typical servings and alcohol content
  • Describe how alcohol affects the human body/mind
  • Identify the various sedative-hypnotic drugs and explain their effect on the human body/brain
  • Explain the history of opiate use
  • Identify the various classes of narcotics and explain their effect on the human body/mind
  • Describe the physical damage that tobacco smoke can have on the human body
  • Explain the main methods of tobacco use and the dangers associated with each
  • Identify the various stimulant drugs and explain their effect on the human body/mind
  • Explain the history of both psychedelics and marijuana use
  • Identify the various psychedelic drugs and explain their effect on the human body/mind
  • Describe the various forms of marijuana use and explain the effects of each on the human body/mind
  • Identify various over-the-counter drugs and explain their effects on the human body/mind
  • Identify various prescription drugs and explain their effects on the human body/mind
  • Explain why athletes seem to be psychologically vulnerable to the use and abuse of psychoactive drugs
  • Explain why drug and alcohol abuse is so often seen as a family affair
  • Explain how the family can function in the primary prevention of drug abuse
  • Describe the basic elements of a comprehensive school policy against the use of alcohol and other drugs

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements:

HEDP 2250 - Introduction to Drug Education

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None

HEDP 2250 is designed to study the “why” aspects of drug use. Emphasis is placed on developing positive attitudes that will help the student to make consistent decisions above drug-related issues. Suitable alternatives to individual drug abuse problems will be presented. Students who successfully complete HEDP 2250 are expected to be able to:

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

HEDP 3330 - African American Health Issues

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None

HEDP 3330 is designed to explore numerous health issues affecting the African American community. An overview of African American health, a historical background in racial disparities in health care, specific health problems as they relate to African American children, women, men and the elderly will specifically be addressed. Violence, homicide and incarceration and how these social and environmental issues affect the Black community will be looked at in this course. Many diseases affect African Americans at increased rates and two such chronic diseases will be discussed in detail in this course: cancer and diabetes. Lifestyle behaviors will be looked at from the perspective of the African American (Substance Use, HIV/AIDS, tobacco use, alcohol use, nutrition, obesity and physical activity). The course will also look at how these existing health disparities can be eliminated. Students who successfully complete HEDP 3330 are expected to be able to:

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

HEDP 3660 - Current Issues in Health

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None

HEDP 3660 – Analysis of the current major issues of health includes the role of the consumer in the theory and practice of self-care, health services and contemporary factors that influence personal choices in all of the facets of healthful living. Students who successfully complete HEDP 3660 are expected to be able to:

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

HIST 1002 - Intro to African Diaspora

A study of the peoples and cultures of African descent throughout the African Diaspora, especially in Africa, the Caribbean, South America and the United States. Emphasis on the political, social and cultural institutions that have contributed to the development of African Diaspora peoples and cultures

HIST 1111 - Survey of World History I

Credits: 3

HIST 1111 is a survey of world history from the prehistoric period to the early modern period, about 1500 C.E. Topics include: Ancient Civilizations; Classic Mediterranean Civilizations; the rise of Christianity and Islam; Asia, Africa, and the Americas prior to the age of European imperialism; and Europe during the Middle Ages. Students who successfully complete GEOG 1101 will be able to:

  • Identify important forces for change that shaped and continue to influence today’s cultures and civilizations and recognize the characteristics of mainstream world cultures, thereby acquiring the different people of the world.
  • Identify the characteristics of the early civilizations of the world, the early empire builders, and the smaller civilizations that had a major impact on the world history.
  • Describe the attributes of classical society and the legacy of the Greco-Roman World
  • Relate the reasons for the spread of Christianity, the issues of the early Church, and the traditions, teachings, and impact of Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, and Islam
  • Trace the major developments in the evolution of civilization in the Medieval West, the Islamic core, eastern and southern Asia, and Africa and the Americas prior to 1500 B.C.E.

Course Requirements:

  • Completion of a research paper
  • Online Discussions, Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Instructor Sharon Sewell Only: Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

HIST 1112 - Survey of World History II

Credits: 3

This course is a survey of world history from the early modern period, about 1300 C. E., to the present. Students who successfully complete HIST 1112 will be able to:

  • Identify important forces for change that shaped and continue to influence today’s cultures and civilizations and recognize the characteristics of mainstream world cultures.
  • Comprehend the traditions, teachings, and impact of Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, and Islam.
  • Trace the major developments in the evolution of civilization in the West, the Islamic core, eastern and southern Asia, and Africa and the Americas after 1300 B.C.E.
  • Comprehend the impact of colonialism and empire-building on Africa, Asia, and Latin America, as well as many of the issues of decolonization and development that still shape much of the third world.
  • Summarize the characteristics of modern political movements such as liberalism, socialism, communism, and fascism.
  • Comprehend the impact of the two Industrial Revolutions on the social, economic, and political life of the modern era.
  • Describe the ideas that shaped the modern mind, including Romanticism, Realism, Conservatism, Liberalism, Nationalism, Darwinism, Freudianism, and Existentialism
  • Trace the causes and cultures of WWI, WWII, and the Cold War

Course Requirements:

  • Completion of a research paper
  • Online Discussions, Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Instructor Sharon Sewell Only: Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

HIST 2111 - U.S. History Through 1877

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 0989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

HIST 2111 is a survey of U.S. History to the post-Civil War period. This course studies the major social, economic, and political developments in the US from the arrival of the Native Americans before the Europeans until end of the Reconstruction. HIST 2111 will offer the student a greater understanding of the issues facing contemporary America. This course satisfies the Georgia Legislative requirement that all students receiving a degree from any unit of the University System shall pass a course or examination in the history of the United States and Georgia. Students who successfully complete HIST 2111 will be able to:

  • Describe the historian’s craft
  • Explain and analyze American history from the revolutionary era through the Reconstruction
  • Evaluate major topics germane to the period of history as reflected in the outline above.
  • Identify key individuals whose statements and actions influenced the course of history.
  • Analyze the themes derivative from diverse world cultural traditions which have found common expression in the unique American civilization.
  • Examine the American experience within the global context.
  • Distinguish among the paramount interpretive debates in the written history covering this era.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Instructor McDermott Requires: Proctored Tests – This course requires 3 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

HIST 2112 - History after 1877

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

HIST 2112 is a survey of U.S. History from the post-Civil War period to the present. This course satisfies the Georgia Legislature requirement that all students receiving a degree from any unit of the University System shall pass a course or examination in the history of the United Sates and Georgia. Students who successfully complete HIST 2112 will be able to:

  • Recognize the major political, economic, social, and cultural events that helped shape the development of the US and be able to discuss the relationship of history to current events and issues affecting the US today.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historical background to some of the issues facing the US in the 20th and 21st centuries.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the key historical events and people who shaped the development of the US after 1877.
  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze and critique historical documents, including primary and secondary sources as well as qualitative and quantitative.
  • Demonstrate the ability to place both facts and opinion in the appropriate context while interpreting a body of historical evidence.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

Instructor McDermott Requires: Proctored Tests – This course requires 3 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

HIST 3511 - Modern Europe I

A study of the most important political, social, economic, intellectual and cultural phases of European life from 1789-1870. Prerequisite: HIST 1111.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion questions
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

Instructor Sharon Sewell Only-Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

HITE 2100 - Health Record Content and Structure

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: ENGL 1101
Co-requisite: ENGL 1102 or permission of instructor

The basic concepts and techniques for managing and maintaining health record systems including storage and retrieval, the use and structure of healthcare data and data sets, quantitative and qualitative analysis of healthcare data, forms design, release of information, function of indexes and registers and the accreditation, certification and licensure standards applicable to healthcare data.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

HITE 2110 - Organization and Supervision in Health Information Management

Introduction to the principles of organization and supervision in order to develop effective skills in leadership, motivation, and team building techniques in the practice of health information management.

Prerequisites: HITE 2100 and ENGL 1102 or permission of instructor.
Corequisites: ALHE 2050.

HITE 2137 - Fundamentals of Health Information Management

This course introduces the student to the field of Health Information Management (HIM) and its role in healthcare delivery systems. Emphasis is placed on the health information management profession, hospital and medical staff organization, structure and content of medical records, quantitative and qualitative analysis, release of patient information, legal aspects of medical records, ethical issues in HIM, healthcare statistics, indexes and registers, electronic medical records, payment and reimbursement systems, and regulatory and accrediting agencies.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Health Information Technology Programs

Corequisites: HITE 2100, HITE 2400

HITE 2150 - Coding I

Principles of ICD-9-CM used in the assignment of valid diagnostic and/or procedure codes.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1100K, HITE 2100, or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite/Corequisites: HITE 2400.

Proctored Tests – this course requires 1 proctored tests. Students living in the Albany area may test at the testing center at Albany State University – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

HITE 2160 - Coding II

Principles of CPT coding system used to assign valid procedure and service codes.

Prerequisite: HITE 2150

Proctored Tests – this course requires 1 proctored test. Students living in the Albany area may test at the testing center at Albany State University – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

HITE 2170 - Advance Coding and Reimbursement

Credits: 3

This course integrates and builds on basic knowledge and skills acquired in HITE 2150 and HITE 2160, enhancing skill level through use of clinical case studies. Reimbursement topics include DRGs, APCs, RBRVs, Chargemasters and Coding Compliance. Students will have live access to a QuadraMed encoder.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L
  • Proctored Tests – this course requires 1 proctored test. Students living in the Albany area may test at the testing center at Albany State University – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

HITE 2200 - Healthcare Statistics

Emphasis is placed on the effective use, collection arrangement, presentation and verification of health care data, and on the concepts of descriptive statistics and data validity and reliability.

Prerequisites: ALHE 2050, MATH 1101, HITE 2100, CISM 2201, or permission of instructor

HITE 2250 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Health Information

An introduction to the legal and ethical issues applicable to health information.

Prerequisite: ALHE 2050 and HITE 2100 or permission of instructor.
Prerequisite/Corequisites: ALHE 2050 and HITE 2110.

HITE 2400 - Pathophysiology & Pharmacology

The study of the nature and cause of disease including the etiology, signs, symptoms, diagnostic evaluation, clinical treatment, and pharmacology management of disease processes.

Prerequisites: BIOL 1100K, HITE 2100, or permission of instructor.
Corequisite: HITE 2150

HITE 2423 - Disease Management

Credits: 3 Corequisite: HITE 2100

An introduction to the pathophysiology of cancer, using principles from anatomy and physiology to This course is an introduction to the pathophysiology of cancer, using principles from anatomy and physiology to provide a foundation for the study of oncology disease process. Diagnostic and staging procedures, treatment modalities including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2500 - Health Information System Applications

The concepts of medical record management through an information system that is an organized combination of people, hardware, software, communication networks and data resources that collect, transform and disseminate information in a healthcare organization.

Prerequisites: HITE 2100 or permission of instructor

HITE 2503 - Fundamentals of Health Records

This course provides an overview of healthcare record content and organization for the transcription student.

Corequisites: HITE 2501.

HITE 2550 - Quality Assessment

Introduction to the principles of the quality assessment process.

HITE 2600 - Professional Practice I

Credits: 2

Supervised clinical experience in an acute care setting.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2610 - Professional Practice II

A continuation of HITE 2600 in alternative healthcare settings.

HITE 2650 - Seminar on Health Information Technology

Exploration of current issues and trends in the health information profession and in the health care industry with emphasis on review for RHIT exam.

Prerequisites: HITE 2100, HITE 2110, HITE 2400, HITE 2500, HITE 2550, HITE 2150, HITE 2250, HITE 2600, or permission of instructor.
Corequisites: HITE 2610, HITE 2160, HITE 2170.

HITE 2717 - Registry Organization

An introduction to cancer registries: hospital-based and central registries; legal issues and confidentiality; data standards set by the national Cancer Institute; program requirements outlined by the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons; type of cancer registries and data users.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Cancer Registry Management Certificate and completion of all learning support requirements.
Corequisite: HITE 2731

HITE 2721 - Introduction to ICD for Registry Management

Credits: 3 Corequisite: HITE 2724, HITE 2738, HITE 2752

An introduction to the pathophysiology of cancer, using principles from anatomy and physiology to provide a foundation for the study of oncology disease process. Diagnostic and staging procedures, treatment modalities, including surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy with emphasis on pharmacology will be addressed.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2724 - Registry Operations

This course will focus on management functions including budgeting, annual reports, staffing determinations, CoC standards, cancer committees, cancer conferences. Basic operational tasks, reference resources and computer hardware and software needs will be introduced.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Cancer Registry Management Program. Completion of all LS requirements.
Corequisites: HITE 2717

HITE 2731 - Patient Follow-up

Credits: 2 Corequisites: HITE 2745, HITE 2752

This course covers cancer patient follow-up methodology, confidentiality, and ethical issues; identification of second primaries, recurrence, spread of disease and survival data. Physical, patient, and other follow-up resources and activities will be introduced.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2738 - Oncology Coding and Staging Systems

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: HITE 2717, HITE 2724, HITE 2423
Corequisite: HITE 2731, HITE 2752

Concepts of coding and staging of malignant neoplasms, including a general overview of International classification of Disease for Oncology (ICD-o) nomenclature and classification system; AJCC and SEER staging extent of disease concepts used by physicians and cancer surveillance organizations to determine treatment and survival.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2745 - Abstracting Principles I

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: HITE 2717, HITE 2738, HITE 2423

Introduction to the principles of cancer registry abstracting; identification and selection of appropriate clinical information from medical records in a manner consistent with cancer registry core data item requirements recording; coding and staging site-specific cancer information; manual and computerized applications will be introduced.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Allied Health Background Check: $49.50

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2746 - Abstracting Principles II

Credits: 2 Prerequisites: HITE 2724, HITE 2731, HITE 2738, HITE 2745, HITE 2717, HITE 2423
Corequisites: HITE 2759

Continuation of the applications of the principles of cancer registry abstracting; identification and selection of appropriate clinical information from medical records in a manner consistent with cancer registry core data item requirements recording; coding and staging site-specific cancer information; use of quality control edits to assure timelines, completeness and accuracy of data.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Health Information Tech Insurance: $17.50

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2752 - Cancer Statistics and Epidemiology

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: HITE 2717
Corequisites: HITE 2731, HITE 2738

Introduction to cancer statistics, descriptive and analytic, epidemiology, cancer surveillance, annual report preparation, presentation of cancer data and special studies; use of cancer statistical data for marketing and strategic planning.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HITE 2759 - Clinical Practicum

Credits: 5 Prerequisites: HITE 2717, HITE 2723, HITE 2724, HITE 2731, HITE 2738, HITE 2745
Corequisites: HITE 2746

Clinical experience performing actual tasks in registry management, data collection processes, data utilization, and computer applications under the supervision of a CTR (Certified Tumor Registrar).

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

HUST 1110 - Families and Other Systems

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, PSYC 1101, or permission of the instructor.

HUST 1110 is a didactic and experiential course that provides an introduction to family systems theory and its implication in family assessment, family therapy, and agency/institution analysis. Topics include a historical perspective on the evolution of family therapy, basic system theory concepts as applied to families and other systems, the family life cycle, and an overview of the major models of family therapy. The students will learn basic family assessment methods and interventions to enable the development of initial treatment plans and facilitate the referral of families to the appropriate community resources.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

HUST 2000 - Group Theory and Process

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, PSYC 1101, or permission of the instructor.

HUST 2000 is designed as an introduction to the theory and process of group interaction. It will combine didactic and experiential activities that will enable the student to become familiar with different types of groups, to recognize the dynamics of group functioning, to understand the rationale for group work, to recognize the skills required to become an effective group facilitator, and to have direct experience in planning, participating in, and leading a group session. Students who successfully complete HUST 2000 will be able to:

  • Discuss the process and leadership roles of group therapy.
  • Identify the stages of development in group therapy.
  • Explain the meaning of group cohesion, interaction, involvement and productivity.
  • Discuss goals, norms, and group membership in group therapy.
  • Describe the theories of group leadership; identify leadership techniques/attributes.
  • Explain ethical principles and multiculturalism in the group setting.
  • Develop and demonstrate awareness of basic group activities.
  • Identify strategies to deal with problematic situations within the group.
  • Describe interaction process analysis.
  • Explain the characteristics of the self-help group

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

HUST 2050 - Counseling Theories and Methods

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, PSYC 1101 or permission of the instructor

HUST 2050 provides an introduction to the major theories of counseling. For each identified theory, basic concepts, definitions of health and normalcy and strategies and interventions will be examined. The student will apply these theories to real case examples and will develop his/her own theory of counseling.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

HUST 2650 - Applied Community Health

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor

HUST 2650 will focus on the application of previous coursework to a variety of healthcare settings. The student is introduced to the field of community health and to the provision of services to people with a wide range of health problems; including a specific emphasis on patient/client populations with disabilities. Topics covered include basic concepts of health/mental health; major types of disabilities; practical usage of the DSM-IV; dual diagnosis and treatment issues; personality disorders and addicted patients/clients; and commonly used interventions to prevent, promote and/or restore the health/mental health of individuals, families and groups. Course material will be directly linked to field placement experiences. Students who successfully complete HUST 2650 will be able to:

  • Define the basic concepts of health/mental health and describe criteria for functional and dysfunctional patterns of behavior.
  • Use the DSM-IV TR and apply diagnostic terminology to clients/patients presenting symptoms.
  • Understand and explain the concept of dual diagnosis and accompanying treatment issues.
  • Describe advantages and disadvantages of traditional treatment approaches to dual diagnosis.
  • Recognize the issues associated with addicted clients/patients with personality disorders.
  • List the major types of disabilities and the characteristics of each.
  • Describe the Americans with Disabilities Act and its implications in the workplace.
  • Identify assistive technologies available to and methods of working with the major types of disabilities.
  • Be able to collect client information, develop a bio-psycho-social evaluation and treatment plan, and develop a case history.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

HUST 2700 - Understanding and Treating Addictions

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor

HUST 2700 is designed to provide basic knowledge in the field of addictions. Emphasis is in three major areas: biopsychosocial factors of alcoholism, drug addiction, and other types of addiction; the pharmacology of psychoactive substances; and the eight components of the skill groups in addiction counseling. Course material in all three areas will be directly linked to the field placement experiences for those students working in addiction/substance abuse treatment settings. Students who successfully complete HUST 2700 will be able to:

  • Understand that addiction is a disease
  • Describe the major classifications of psychoactive drugs and pharmacological differences of each
  • Identify and understand the core functions of the eight skill groups of addiction counseling
  • List and describe the 12 principles of the National Association of Addiction Counselor’s Code of Ethics
  • Discuss substance abuse and infectious diseases as well as universal precautions to be used
  • Know relapse triggers
  • Understand the concept of dual diagnosis
  • Discuss addiction and the family
  • Evaluate a variety of substance abuse problems
  • Discuss substance abuse and ethnic minorities

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

HUST 2750 - Current Trends in Addiction and Mental Health

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: HUST 2700 or permission of the instructor.

HUST 2750 addresses contemporary issues in addictions and mental health. Emphasis is in four major areas: ethnic and cultural issues that influence diagnosis, treatment and utilization of services, special populations such as consumers/clients with HIV/AIDS; dual diagnosis; and matching treatment services to individual client needs. In addition attention will be given to the following current issues in the fields: treatment issues for adolescent and geriatric consumers/clients; spiritual concerns and disciplines; gay/lesbian issues; relapse dynamics and prevention, and managed care and treatment costs.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

ISCI 2001 - Life/Earth Science

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: Teacher Education major status.

An integrated overview of the core Life and Earth Science content covered in the K-5 Georgia Performance Standards. Topics include the Solar System, Earth Processes, Characteristics of Living Organisms, Biodiversity and the Natural History of Georgia. Students will gain conceptual understanding through Inquiry-Oriented, Activity-Based pedagogical strategies in order to have experience learning science content in the ways they will be expected to teach in the future.

Students who successfully complete ISCI 2001 are expected to be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature and principles of scientific inquiry and honesty.
  • Apply knowledge of strategies for observing, collecting, analyzing and communication scientific data.
  • Understand basic principles of the earth sciences
  • Understand the basic principles of astronomy.
  • Communicate all of the above science principles successfully to elementary school students in accordance with the Georgia Performance Standards.
  • Recognize pseudoscience and scientific reports of questionable validity.

Course Requirements:

  • Students will work together in groups toward the creation of an imaginary world (Neo-World project)
  • Lab reports are required regularly
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • Labs use basic household materials
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker

ISCI 2002 - Physical Science

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: Teacher Education major status.

Activity - based Physical Science for Early Childhood Education Performance majors. Course addresses content covered by Standards (GPS) for K-5 grades. Topics include matter and energy. Georgia Performance Standards alignment.

Students who successfully complete ISCI 2002 are expected to be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature and principles of scientific inquiry and honesty.
  • Apply knowledge of strategies for observing, collecting, analyzing and communication scientific data.
  • Understand basic principles of the physical sciences
  • Communicate physical science principles successfully to elementary school students in accordance with the Georgia Performance Standards.
  • Recognize pseudoscience and scientific reports of questionable validity.
  • Experience a sense of wonder as the universe is contemplated.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • Scientific calculator - suggested: Texas Instruments TI-30Xa
  • Materials for laboratory exercises (common household items, ruler, glue, etc. – and some grocery items, eggs, cabbage, etc.)
  • A small kitchen/diet scale that has “gram” measurements on it (<$15)
  • A model rocket kit and Launchpad/controller (<$25)
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView, See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker

JAPN 1001 - Elementary Japanese I

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher

JAPN 1001 is An oral approach to the language, with fundamentals of grammar and emphasis on conversation, supplemented by oral-aural drills in the language laboratory. Students who successfully complete this course are expected to:

  • Introduce themselves and respond to introductions, and engage in brief conversations in Japanese, greeting others and saying good-bye appropriately.
  • Address others appropriately with respect to social relationship and context.
  • Describe their home and their hometown, both orally and in writing.
  • Express agreement and disagreement.
  • Ask and answer questions about locations.
  • Master two of the writing systems (Hiragana and Katakana).
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of Kanji (Chinese characters).
  • Compare and contrast some features of Japanese culture with those of the culture of the United States.
  • Locate and utilize cultural resources through the Internet.
  • Discuss at least one issue of current concern in Japan and relate it to issues of concern in the United States.
  • Recognize and discuss some of the contributions of Japan to the humanities and world civilization.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele).
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Computer Microphone

JAPN 1002 - Elementary Japanese II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: JAPN 1001 with a grade C or higher

A continuation of Japanese 1001 that further develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Japanese while including cultural, historical, and literary components

At the end of this class, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate elementary oral and aural proficiency of the Japanese language.
  • Demonstrate elementary reading and writing proficiency of the Japanese language.
  • Recognize and discuss the Japanese culture.

Course Requirements:

  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele).
  • Computer Microphone

Additional Requirements:

JAPN 2002 - Intermediate Japanese II

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: JAPN 1002 with a grade of C or higher

JAPN 2002 is a continuation of JAPN 2001 and includes intermediate grammar, expansion of vocabulary and continued practice in conversation, writing and reading, and advancing knowledge of Japan related issues.

At the end of this class, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate elementary oral and aural proficiency of the Japanese language.
  • Demonstrate elementary reading and writing proficiency of the Japanese language.
  • Recognize and discuss the Japanese culture.

Course Requirements:

  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele).

Additional Requirements:

LEAD 1101 - Leadership Development

The purpose of the course is to help students identify the attributes of effective leaders so that they can build their leadership potential and develop skills that will be of benefit to them personally and in their chosen profession.

MATH 0987 - Foundations for Quantitative Reasoning

A course designed to help students learn the basics of algebra and other topics necessary for Quantitative Skills and Reasoning (MATH 1001), including the study of elementary algebra, real number sets, set operations, linear equations, and introductory probability and statistics.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of this class, students will be able:

  1. To review basic arithmetic skills using fractions and decimals;
  2. To perform operations with signed numbers;
  3. To solve linear equations and applied problems;
  4. To graph linear equations in two variables;
  5. To simplify polynomials and exponential expressions;
  6. To simplify perfect squares using a calculator

Course Requirements:

Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

This course requires a TI 83/84 calculator.

MATH 0989 - Foundations for College Algebra

In this course, students learn basic algebra topics which prepare them for College Algebra 1111. It is a study of elementary algebra, which includes graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations, factoring polynomials, and simplifying rational expressions and exponents. Students will also be taught how to solve radicals, and complex numbers, as well as define and evaluate functions

Students who successfully complete MATH 0989 are expected to be able to:

  • Perform operations with signed numbers;
  • Solve linear equations, applied problems, and linear inequalities;
  • Graph linear equations in two variables;
  • Simplify polynomials
  • Factor polynomials.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply concepts learned.

Course Requirements:

  • Average of 70 or above
  • Successful completion of the Departmental Final Examination
  • Students required to spend a minimum of one hour per week in the Math Lab (online or on-campus)
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 2 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Graphing calculator- TI-83 or TI-84

THIS COURSE IS RESTRICTED TO ONLINE ONLY STUDENTS WHO DO NOT RESIDE IN THE ALBANY AREA.

MATH 0997 - Support for Quantitative Reasoning

Prerequisites: MATH 0987 or required scores for co-requisite remediation placement.

Corequisites: MATH 1001.

This course provides an introduction to the algebraic concepts and techniques necessary for MATH 1001. This course will focus on additional support for MATH 1001 assignments and will serve as a continuation of the information covered in the MATH 1001 classroom. The topics covered include performing basic operations with rational and real numbers, representing mathematical relationships symbolically, set notation, evaluating expressions, plotting and graphing in the Cartesian coordinate system, using percentages, and solving linear equations.

At the end of this class, students will be able:

  • To translate mathematical relationships from English into mathematical symbols;
  • To represent sets using correct notation and symbols;
  • To perform operations with fractions, real numbers, and variable expressions;
  • To solve linear equations in one variable;
  • To evaluate expressions involving multiple variables given the value of each variable;
  • To graph points and interpret graphs in the xy-coordinate system;
  • To perform basic and statistical computations using a calculator.

Course Requirements:

  • Quizzes
  • Homework/lab assignments
  • Participation and daily grades

Additional Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login See System Checker.
  • Graphing Calculator TI-83 or TI-84

MATH 0999 - Support for College Algebra

Corequisite: MATH 1111.

This course is a co-requisite to College Algebra Math 1111. It includes topics on real numbers and their properties, exponents, radicals, polynomials, factoring including special products, rational expressions, and the Coordinate System. Those topics assist students in comprehending the college algebra topics of complex numbers, linear and quadratic equations, functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and all of their respected graphs. Students will effectively communicate algebraic concepts in oral and written forms, supported by the appropriate use of technology.

At the end of this class, students will be able:

  • Perform operations complex numbers and algebraic expressions expected of students entering MATH1111
  • Perform operations with radical and rational expressions
  • Perform factoring techniques on polynomial expressions
  • Understand mathematical terminology expected of students entering MATH1111
  • Relate concepts of algebra to real-world applications
  • Solve linear, quadratic, and rational equations
  • Analyze graphs and demonstrate a knowledge of the basic mathematical graphs used often in MATH1111
  • Solve linear inequalities and be able to write answers in set-builder and interval notation
  • Evaluate expressions for given input values
  • Understand the definition of a function, function notation, and perform operations on functions
  • Determine the domain, range, and where a function is increasing, decreasing or constant
  • Identify the leading term, degree, leading coefficient and constant term of polynomial expressions
  • Use long and synthetic division to calculate the quotient and remainder of polynomial expressions
  • Demonstrate how to use the graphing calculator to analyze graphs
  • Use the laws of exponents to simplify expressions
  • Evaluate and graph exponential and logarithmic functions

Course Requirements:

  • Quizzes
  • Homework/lab assignments
  • Participation and daily grades

Additional Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login
  • Graphing calculator- TI-83 or TI84

MATH 1001 - Quantitative Skills and Reasoning

Prerequisite: MATH 0099, MATH 0987, MATH 0989 or satisfactory math scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher.

This course is an alternative in Area A of the Core Curriculum and is not intended to supply sufficient algebraic background for students who intend to take Precalculus, Trigonometry, or the Calculus sequence for mathematics and science plans of study. This course places quantitative skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will likely encounter. It emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined. A graphing calculator is required. MATH 1001 is a math course for non-science plans of study and may be used as a prerequisite to MATH 2205 and/or MATH 1145. Students receiving credit for MATH 1001 cannot receive credit for MATH 1111.

Students who successfully complete MATH 1111 will be able to:

  • Identify logical fallacies and show how to avoid them
  • Identify, organize and analyze logical arguments through the use of formalized techniques
  • Apply logical techniques to real world problems

Numbers:

Students will be able to:

  • Recognize differences in the various types of number systems and apply basic arithmetic operations
  • Demonstrate competency in using unit conversion including, but not restricted to, SI metric system and the USCS
  • Distinguish between the uses and abuses of percentages
  • Translate numbers to and from scientific notation

Probability and Statistics:

Students will be able to:

  • Use elementary level statistical terminology to interpret statistical information
  • Distinguish between causation and correlation
  • Interpret statistical information presented graphically
  • Organize data from samples to be used for statistical calculations
  • Compute measures of central tendency and variation
  • Analyze statistical data to test hypothesis
  • Compute and combine probability for given events using standardized rules
  • Compute combinations and permutations

Math and Money:

Students will be able to:

  • Prepare and read a personal financial statement
  • Recognize the relationships between income & assets and expenses and liabilities and how these influence the financial statement
  • Compute and interpret cash flow and net worth
  • Use compounded interest formulas to predict investment performance
  • Recognize differences and similarities in various asset classes and investment options
  • Compute payments for installment loans; such as credit cards, mortgages and student loans
  • Recognize differences between tax deductions and tax credits as well as compute income tax from an AGI

Course Requirements:

  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Graphing calculator- TI-83 or TI84

MATH 1111 - College Algebra

3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Developmental MATH 0099 or Placement Test.

This course includes a study of topics in real numbers, linear and quadratic equations, complex numbers, various types of other functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities.

Students who successfully complete MATH 1111 will:

  • Know functions and their graphs
  • Know inequalities, linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions
  • Be able to use the graphing calculator in implementing algebraic skills
  • Be able to demonstrate the ability to apply concepts learned
  • Have an increased awareness of the importance of mathematics in your desired major

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 5 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker.
  • Graphing calculator- TI-83 or TI84

MATH 1113 - Pre-Calculus

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or Placement Test

This course is the study of functions and their graphs. Topics include trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, transcendental functions and polar coordinates.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click online courses and then System Checker
  • Graphing calculator- TI-83 or TI84

MATH 1211 - Calculus I

Credits: 4 Prerequisite: MATH 1113

This is a beginning course in calculus. Topics include differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions, with applications to graphs of functions, rectilinear motion, maxima and minima, areas, volumes and work.

Students will be able to

  1. Define and find limits graphically, numerically, and analytically
  2. Evaluate limits of algebraic and transcendental functions
  3. Evaluate limits using the Squeeze Theorem
  4. Evaluate infinite limits and limits at infinity
  5. Identify continuity of points and intervals
  6. Use the Intermediate Value Theorem
  7. Apply L’Hopital’s Rule to evaluate limits with indeterminate forms

Derivatives:

Students will be able to

  1. Determine the derivative of a function utilizing limits
  2. Evaluate the derivative of a function using the Constant Rule, Power Rule, Constant Multiple Rule, Sum and Difference Rules, Product Rule, Quotient Rule, and Chain Rule
  3. Recall and apply derivative formulas of transcendental functions
  4. Evaluate higher-order derivatives of functions
  5. Use derivatives to determine rates of change
  6. Use implicit differentiation to find the derivative of a function
  7. Use related rates to solve real world problems
  8. Using derivatives to find extrema, inflection points, increasing/decreasing intervals and concavity from the equation of a function
  9. Apply derivative rules to solve optimization problems
  10. Understand and use Rolle’s Theorem and the Mean Value Theorem
  11. Find the differential of a function and estimate a propagated error using a differential

The student will be able to

  1. Use rules of integration to integrate definite and indefinite functions of algebraic and transcendental functions
  2. Approximate the area under a curve using Riemann Sums
  3. Understand and use the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus
  4. Apply the Mean Value Theorem for Integrals
  5. Use the Substitution Rule to integrate the composition of functions

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • PProctored Tests – This course requires 5 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone. This course has more stringent standards than Albany State University's minimum requirements. Libraries, K-12 schools, and administrators are routinely denied.

Additional Requirements:

  • Graphing calculator- TI-83 or TI84 (TI-89 calculators are NOT allowed)

MATH 1401 - Intro to Statistics

A course in basic statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, hypothesis testing, inferences, correlation, and regression.

Prerequisites: MATH 1001, MATH 1111, or MATH 1113

Note: This is an eCore course - tuition is $169 per credit hour

Course Requirements:

  • Students must take the eCore Orientation quiz prior to registering for this class.
  • All eCore classes require one-two proctored exams.
  • This course requires a TI 83/84 calculator.

MATH 1501 - Calculus

This course is a four (4) credit hour course and includes material on functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, antidifferentiation, the definite integral, applications of integration and techniques of integration.

Prerequisites: MATH 1113

Note: This is an eCore course - tuition is $169 per credit hour.

Course Requirements:

  • Students must take the eCore Orientation quiz prior to registering for this class.
  • All eCore classes require one-two proctored exams.
  • This course requires a TI 83/84 calculator.

MATH 2008 - Foundations of Numbers and Operations

Credits: 3 Prerequisite(s): MATH 1101, MATH 1111, or MATH 1113

This course is an Area F introductory mathematics course for early childhood majors. This course will emphasize the understanding and use of the major concepts of number and operations. As a general theme, strategies of problem solving will be used and discussed in the context of various topics.

Students who successfully complete MATH 2008 are expected to be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of numerical structure and operations on numbers.
  • Develop reasoning skills and the ability to apply mathematical techniques to solve problems.
  • Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers and number systems.
  • Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
  • Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
  • Apply multiple problem solving strategies and understand how approaches to solutions relate to one another.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Graphing Calculator- TI-83, 84, 85, or 86

MATH 2111 - Linear Algebra

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: MATH 1211

This course concentrates on operations with vectors, matrices, systems of linear equations, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Students who successfully complete MATH 2111 are expected to be able to:

  • Solve systems of linear equations using Gaussian or Gauss-Jordan elimination of matrices.
  • Perform basic matrix operations.
  • Calculate the determinant of a square matrix
  • Compute the inverse of a nonsingular matrix
  • Identify operations on vectors
  • Identify vector spaces and subspaces
  • Determine the span of a set of vectors
  • Identify and apply properties of an inner product
  • Compute an orthonormal basis using the Gram-Schmidt process
  • Determine whether a function is a linear transformation
  • Solve problems by applying knowledge of eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
  • Using the graphing calculator and other appropriate technology for computation and exploration of concepts in linear algebra.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Graphing Calculator- TI-83, 84, 85, or 86

MATH 2411 - Introduction to Statistics

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113

This course will include an introduction to probability and basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics. The computer and graphing calculators will be an integral part of this course.

Students who successfully complete MATH 2411 are expected to be able to:

  • Identify and explain the use of various data collection methods.
  • Construct, read, and interpret displays of data (i.e. frequency distributions, histograms, frequency polygons, gives, time series graphs, Pareto charts, pie graphs, stem and leaf plots, boxplots, etc.)
  • Identify appropriate counting techniques and calculate possible outcomes.
  • Identify possible outcomes of a simple experiment and calculate the probability of the event.
  • Construct a probability distribution for a random variable
  • Find probabilities for a normally distributed variable by transforming it into a standard normal variable
  • Use the central limit theorem to solve problems involving sample means for large and small samples.
  • Find the confidence interval for the mean for large and small samples.
  • Determine the nature of the relationship between two variables using scatter plots, correlation, and regression.
  • Use appropriate technology for computation and exploration of probability and statistics.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Proctored Tests – This course requires 5 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.This course has more stringent standards than Albany State University’s minimum requirements. Libraries, K-12 schools, and administrators are routinely denied.

Additional Requirements

MESA 0099 - MESA Orientation Online

Credits: 3 Restricted to MESA students; exceptions approved by MESA Director

MESA 0099 assists students in acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to reach their educational objectives in engineering, mathematics, and science-related fields. Topics include; career decisions and strategies, educational and personal enrichment, study skills and habits, time management, academic preparation, and success in college. Field trips may be required. Students receive a pass/fail grade. The course may serve as an elective for majors in the science and Math Division.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

MGMT 3105 - Legal Environment of Business

This course provides an overview of the statutory, case, and regulatory laws that impact the relationship between law and business. The course provides insight into the elements that are critical to analyzing and understanding the relationship between law and business.

MGMT 3106 - Management Science and Operations Management

Prerequisite: ECON 3205

This course covers the principles, concepts, modeling and decision making techniques for business operations management. The typical topics include issues and tasks of operations management, operations strategy, decision making and optimization, total quality management, capacity planning, facility layout, and materials planning.

MGMT 4110 - Organizational Behavior

Prerequisite: MGMT 3105 or MGHC 3120

This course is designed for students to learn individual and group skills required for effective functioning in an organizational context. Topics include global competition, leadership, motivation, diversity, decision making, group dynamics, culture, organizational development, and systems.

MGMT 4199 - Business Policy

Prerequisite: Senior standing, BUSA 4105, ECON 3205, FINC 3105, MGMT 3105 or MGHC 3120, MGMT 3106, 4110 and MKTG 3120

A capstone course that integrates knowledge acquired in accounting, economics, finance, operations management,information systems, management, and marketing in the formation of business strategies. Case study method is emphasized.

MGMT 4205 - Management Information Systems

Prerequisite: MIST 2010. (Cross listed with MIST 4205.)

An overview course designed to introduce students to the area of information systems. It emphasizes concepts, components and structures of information systems and their applications in business and managerial decision making.

MGMT 6108 - Quantitative Methods for Managers

This course introduces students to the major quantitative techniques used in management decision making. Topics include deterministic and probability models, decision theory, game theory, linear programming, production planning, operating technology, simulation, dynamic programming and advanced applications of statistics. Computer applications are emphasized. Prerequisite: MGMT 4110 or MGMT 5200. Offered: Fall and Spring.

MGMT 6110 - Organizational Behavior and Effectiveness

This course enhances understanding of all aspects of behavior in organizational settings through the systematic study of individual, group and organizational processes. The approach is experiential and focuses on organization development, leadership, and teamwork. The goal of the course is to gain competencies to improve organizational effectiveness and enhance competitive advantage. Offered: Fall .

MGMT 6199 - Business Policy and Strategic Managment

This course can be taken only after completion of at least 27 hours of MBA courses.The purpose of the course is to give the student an opportunity to develop and appreciate skills and perspectives, capabilities needed by higher-level leaders and managers in all types of organizations. Emphasis is given to the integration of subject matter from all business courses and other disciplines in formulating, implementing and evaluating cross-functional decisions that enable the organization to achieve its goals and objectives. Comprehensive analysis of organizations in a wide variety of situations is conducted. This is the capstone MBA course. Offered: As needed.

MIST 2010 - Fundamentals of Computer Applications

3 credit hours

Pre-requisites: READ 0099, ENGL 0099, ENGL 0989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation of higher; MATH 0099, MATH 0987, MATH 0989 or satisfactory math scores to place into co-requisite remediation of higher.

An introductory hands-on course designed to cover word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentations, e-mail, and world-wide web.

Students who successfully complete MIST 2010 will be able to:

  • Create basic word-processing documents using Microsoft Word.
  • Prepare basic worksheets and charts using Microsoft Excel.
  • Construct basic database tables and queries using Microsoft Access.
  • Produce basic presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint.
  • Integrate Microsoft Office products to (a) produce charts in Microsoft Word and/or PowerPoint and (b) create form letters and/or labels in Microsoft Word using data from Microsoft Excel and/or Access.
  • Identify key computing concepts and apply them to multiple real-world scenarios.
  • Identify key functions of multiple Web browsers.
  • Identify key functions of a Windows Operating System.
  • Create and manage files using Microsoft Windows.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments.
  • Basic computer skills: Typing, Internet use, E-mail, etc.
  • High-speed Internet access (DSL or cable)
  • A Windows computer (this course cannot be completed with a Mac) and a version of Microsoft Office that includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. There is no version of Access that runs on a Mac.
  • The specific requirements will depend upon textbook and software availability. Contact the college bookstore or the instructor before you purchase any materials.

Additional Requirements:

MIST 2040 - Communication for Management

Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 or 1101E and ENGL 1102.

3 semester hours

Applications of the principles of verbal and nonverbal communication. Management concepts of business ethics and problem analysis are integrated with communication process and theory.

MIST 3330 - Human-Computer Interactions

This course is a study of development and implementation processes, tactics, and strategies based upon systems planning results. Special attention is devoted to development of end-user support systems.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MIST 4206 - Database Management

Prerequisite: MIST 2010

Credits: 3

Offered: As Needed

An introductory course to database management and its system implementation techniques. It covers the structure of database management systems, database design, Entity-Relationship modeling, normal forms, relational database theory, the structural query language (SQL), and database system development and management using an industrial leading database system such as ORACLE. (Cross listed with MGMT 4206.)

MIST 4207 - Systems Analysis & Design

Prerequisite: MIST 4205

Offered: Spring

This course covers all the major phases of a complete systems development life cycle (SDLC), business modeling techniques such as Entity-Relationship diagramming, data flow diagraming, and the use of Integrated Computer-Aided Software Engineering (I-CASE) tools to support systems development. (Cross listed with MGMT 4207.)

MIST 4220 - Special Topics/Research

Prerequisite: Senior standing

Credits: 3

Offered: Spring

Designed to provide senior students with an opportunity to conduct research projects for publication in journals. Students will investigate new trends in Information Systems business and industry, Information Systems curricula, and Information Systems research.

MIST 4240 - Computer Programming in Business

.

MIST 4260 - E-Commerce

Prerequisite: Junior Standing

Offered: Spring

The course investigates the evaluation, implementation, and disadvantages of electronic-commerce systems; and introduces students to the concepts of electronic commerce.

MKTG 3120 - Principles of Marketing

Credits: 3 Prerequisites: ECON 2106

A course designed to show the characteristics, history, and functions related to marketing. Emphasis is on product definition, promotion, distribution and pricing.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MKTG 6170 - Marketing Management

Designed to high light the difference between product marketing and the marketing of services and to provide students who are interested in pursuing careers in the service sector of the economy with a more in-depth coverage of the services area than is presently available in the traditional product marketing courses. Prerequisite: MKTG 3120. Offered: Fall .

MLTS 1160L - Medical Laboratory Technology I LAB

Credits: 1 Pre-requisite: Admission to the MLT program
Co-requisite: MLTS 1160W

The laboratory component of the course is utilized to develop skills and competencies required to perform laboratory analysis of blood and body fluids.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1160W - Medical Lab Technology I

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: Admission to the MLT program.
Co-requisite: None

An in-depth study of the sciences of hematology and body fluids analysis. It deals with the morphology of blood and blood-forming tissues, the principles of blood sample collections, and the composition and function of multiple body fluids. Physiology and pathology are emphasized.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University’s testing centers (East, West, or Cordele Campuses) or online through Proctor U. Testing through Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

MLTS 1161L - Medical Laboratory Technology II LAB

Credits: 1 Pre-requisite: Admission to the MLT program
Co-requisite: MLTS 1161W

The laboratory component of the course is utilized to develop skills and competencies required to perform blood banking procedures and to maintain procedures for the efficient operation of a blood bank.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1161W - Medical Lab Technology II

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: Admission to the MLT program.
Co-requisite: MLTS 1161L

This course provides an introduction to the principles of immunology and provides the student with a concise and thorough guide to transfusion practices and immunohematology.

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1182 - Parasitology, Mycology and Virology

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: BIOL 2211k and admission to the MLT program.
Co-requisite: None

A course in clinical parasitology, mycology, and virology covers human fungal, parasitic and viral infections. The course presents mechanism of infection, life cycles, and infectious states of the organisms as well as disease progression within the host and the practical application of laboratory procedures for detection and identification. Also included is safety, specimen collection, preservation, transport, methods of identification and therapy.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

Proctored Tests –

Instructor Mary Hays: This course requires 5 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

MLTS 1300 - Introduction to Histology

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: Admission into the Histologic Technician program
Co-requisite: None

This course emphasizes the introductory study of basic histology. Structure and identification of tissue systems and organs is emphasized at the cellular level. The laboratory component is structured to enhance the student’s knowledge of certain histological preparations of human and veterinary tissue. Identification of images is achieved through virtual microscopy.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1310L - Histology I LAB

Credits: 1 Pre-requisite: Admission into the Histologic Technician program.
Co-requisite: MLTS 1310W

The course is a laboratory component complementary to MLTS 1310W. It is utilized to develop entry level skills required to perform non-staining histological procedures.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1310W - Histology I

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: MLTS 1300 and admission into the Histologic Technician program.
Co-requisite: MLTS 1310L

This course emphasizes some of the competencies required to perform routine histological procedures. These would include tissue fixation, principles and application of microtomy, embedding techniques, laboratory operations, decalcification, solution preparation and processing.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1320L - Histology II LAB

Credits: 1 Pre-requisite: MLTS 1300
Co-requisite: MLTS 1320W

The course is a laboratory component complementary to MLTS 1320W. The laboratory component of the course is utilized to develop skills required to perform routine and special stains. Students will identify and provide clinical correlation of routine and special stains.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1320W - Histology II

Credits: 2 Pre-requisite: MLTS 1310W0 and admission into the Histologic Technician program.
Co-requisite: MLTS 1320L

This course emphasizes the fundamentals and clinical significance of routine and special histological staining procedures. The student will differentiate between different classes of special stains performed in a histology laboratory.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1330 - Histology ID III

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: Admission into the Histologic Technician program.
Co-requisite: None

Students practice histotechnology procedures in a supervised histology lab setting. The laboratory component of the course is utilized to develop skills and competencies required to perform routine and special histology procedures.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1340 - Histology IV Clinical Rotation

Credits: 5 Prerequisites: MLTS 1300, MLTS 1310w, MLTS 1320w, MLTS 1310L, MLTS 1320L, and MLTS 1330 or permission of the program director.
Co-requisite: None

This course is the practicum designed to enhance and refine techniques taught in the first semester. Students are required to complete at least 300 clinical hours in an approved affiliate histology laboratory. Orientation to departmental and institutional policies and procedures is required.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1350 - Histology V

Credits: 2 Pre-requisite: MLTS 1300, MLTS 1310, MLTS 1320 and MLTS 1330.
Co-requisite: None

A study of immunohistochemistry procedures and interpretations.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 1360 - Histology VI

Credits: 1 Pre-requisite: MLTS 1300L, MLTS 1310W, MLTS 1320L, MLTS 1320W, MLTS 1330
Co-requisite: None

Seminars in Histology: Various professional topics are presented for discussion including board exam reviews, professionalism, laboratory information systems and management principles.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements

MLTS 2010L - Medical Laboratory Technology III LAB

Credits: 2 Pre-requisite: BIOL 2211K and admission into the MLT program.
Co-requisite: MLTS 2010W

The laboratory component of the course develops the skills and competencies required to perform the diagnostic procedures.

Prerequisite: MLTS 2010W.

Course Requirements:

Proctored Tests – this course requires 4 proctored tests. Students living in the Albany area may test at the testing center at Albany State University – students who live outside the Albany area must arrange with their instructor for an approved proctoring site – off-site proctor approval forms are found within your course. (Proctored testing prices vary greatly from site to site; please check your local area for proctored costs for this course.)

MLTS 2010W - Medical Lab Technology III

Credits: 2 Pre-requisite: BIOL 2211K and admission into the MLT program.
Co-requisite: MLTS 1310L

This course is a study of parasites, bacteria, viruses, mycobacteria, fungi, and their relationship to human disease states. Discussion is centered on the cultivation, methods of identification, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and serological diagnosis.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 2020L - Medical Laboratory Technology IV LAB

Credits: 1 Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the MLT program
Co-requisite: MLTS 2020W

The laboratory component is used to develop the skills and competencies required to operate and standardize the instruments utilized in the performance of chemical tests. The use of quality control is emphasized.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements

MLTS 2020W - Medical Lab Technology IV

Credits: 3 Pre-requisite: CHEM 1212k
Co-requisite: MLTS 2020L

An in-depth study of analytical techniques utilized to measure the biochemical entities of blood and various body fluids. The correlation of test results to human physiology and pathology is emphasized.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

MLTS 2630 - Medical Laboratory Technology Externship

Credits: 15 Pre-requisite: MLTS 1160, MLTS 1161, MLTS 2010, MLTS 2020
Co-requisite: None

Students are introduced to the clinical laboratory in an affiliate clinical laboratory setting. The students receive an orientation to each department and an introduction to hospital policies and procedures. Each student rotates through appropriate departments and is allowed to demonstrate and develop their skills and competencies in blood bank, hematology, microbiology, chemistry, phlebotomy, and body fluid analysis under the supervision of the laboratory staff instructor.

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements

MLTS 2670 - Seminars in Medical Laboratory Science

Credits: 1 Corequisites: MLTS 2630

Seminar presentations on various topics related to medical laboratory science (topic reviews for board exams, professionalism, laboratory information systems, case presentations and/or other).

Course Requirements:

  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements

MUSC 1080 - College Concert Band

Credits: 1 Prerequisite: Ability to play a band instrument at college level.

This course involves the study, rehearsal, and concert performance of literature for band. This course involves a performance ensemble open to college students and community members. Repertory is consistent with proficiency levels of participants, but is challenging. May be taken for two semesters before advancing to MUSC 2080 College Concert Band 2. Required of students studying woodwind, brass, and percussion as their performance ensemble during enrollment. Additional rehearsals may be announced by the instructor. Students who successfully complete MUSC 1080 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate correct playing position and posture for chosen instrument.
  • Perform music literature at the level five and six difficulty level.
  • Sight-read music literature at the level four or greater difficulty level .
  • Demonstrate ability to perform individually, in small groups and as a member of an ensemble.
  • Tune instrument accurately to appropriate sound sources and/or electronic tuners.
  • Demonstrate correct breathing, embouchure, articulation, characteristic tone, vibrato, and technical skills on the chosen instrument.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of music vocabulary necessary for study, rehearsal, and performance of music.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 1090 - College Choir I

Credits: 1 Prerequisite: None

This course involves the study, rehearsal, and concert performance of literature for choir. It's open to all students who enjoy singing. Repertory includes wide range of choral music representing all styles and periods. May be taken for two semesters before advancing to MUSC 2090 College Choir 2. Required of students studying vocal as their performance ensemble during enrollment. Extra rehearsals called at the discretion of the director. Students who successfully complete MUSC 1090 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate correct posture for singing.
  • Demonstrate correct breathing techniques for vocal production.
  • Sing with clear vowel sound, proper diction and appropriate tone quality.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in sight-reading at the expected competency level.
  • Perform selected music repertoire at expected competency level.
  • Demonstrate ability to perform individually, in small groups, and as a member of an ensemble.
  • Sing from memory selected music for public performance.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of music vocabulary necessary for study, rehearsal and performance of music.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 1100 - Music Appreciation

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None

General education course for non-music majors. Study of the basic materials of music and a survey of important examples of music literature, style periods, and representative composers from the sixth century to the present day. Emphasizes techniques for listening analytically and critically. Students who successfully complete MUSC 1100 will be able to:

  • recognize various styles, forms, and major historical periods of western music
  • identify and discuss musical forms and their stylistic aspects of western music
  • apply musical terms and concepts to different musical forms within the various style periods
  • listen to music or examine scores to describe the elements (rhythm, melody, harmony, form, dynamics, and timbre) of music
  • analyze and make critical judgments and about music
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical and cultural context of Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionist, and 20th century music
  • Demonstrate proper audience etiquette

Course Requirements:

  • Open Educational Resources (OER) with no textbook purchase available.
  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Extensive listening assignments
  • Concert and recital attendance
  • Term paper

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 1101 - Elementary Music Theory I

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None

This course is a study of rhythm and its notation. Pitch and its notation, scales, keys, modes, and intervals, harmony (triads, chords, root positions, figured bass conventions). Harmonic analysis techniques, cadences, aspects of melodic construction, and voice leading principles. Students who successfully complete MUSC 1101 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of music notation, part-writing, and analytical techniques
  • Demonstrate of knowledge of music vocabulary

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 1102 - Elementary Music Theory II

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: MUSC 1101

This course is a study of voice leading principles (review), functional tonality, seventh chords, and form. Students who successfully complete MUSC 1102 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of music notation, part-writing, and analytical techniques.
  • Demonstration of knowledge of music vocabulary.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 2201 - Advanced Theory I

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: MUSC 1102

This course is a study of borrowed chords, secondary dominants, secondary seventh chords, and analysis of small forms. Students who successfully complete MUSC 2201 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of music notation, part-writing, and analytical techniques.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of music vocabulary through written assignments.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 2202 - Advanced Theory II

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: MUSC 2201

This course is a study of Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords and other chromatic chord forms, chords of the ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth, and advanced modulation. Harmonic techniques of the classical period, Sonata form, the Rondo, nineteenth century harmonic developments, twentieth century compositional techniques, and recent musicaldevelopments will also be introduced. Students who successfully complete MUSC 2202 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of music notation, part-writing, and analytical techniques.
  • Demonstration of knowledge of music vocabulary through written assignments.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 2211 - Applied Music for Music Majors Only

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: MUSC 1090 (students studying voice) or permission of program director; or MUSC 1080 (students studying instrumental) or MUSC 1070 (students studying string) or permission of program director, or MUSC 1080 or 1090 (students studying guitar and piano) or permission of program director.

Designed for music plans of study. A one-hour private music lesson each week leading to advanced technical proficiency and performance of advanced solo literature. Students learn repertoire necessary for transfer into a music baccalaureate degree program. Students may take the course each semester until they complete the objectives of the course. A minimum of five hours of practice a week is required. Students who successfully complete MUSC 2211 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate correct performance playing/singing position and posture in performance.
  • Read and perform music literature to the level IV – VI level of difficulty.
  • Demonstrate the ability to perform individually.
  • Demonstrate understanding of music theory through performance.
  • Recognize key signatures of performed music and perform appropriate scales and arpeggios from memory.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of music vocabulary necessary for study, rehearsal, and performance of music.
  • Perform interpretations of standard/appropriate music repertoire.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MUSC 2212 - Applied Music for Music Majors Only

Credits: 2 Corequisite: MUSC 1090 (students studying voice) or permission of program director; or MUSC 1070 (students studying string) or permission of program director, MUSC 1080 (students studying instrumental) or permission of program director; or MUSC 1080 or 1090 (students studying guitar and piano) or permission of program director.

Prerequisite: MUSC 2211, MUSC 1101, MUSC 1102.

Designed for music plans of study. A one-hour private music lesson each week leading to advanced technical proficiency and performance of advanced solo literature. Students learn repertoire necessary for transfer into a music baccalaureate degree program. Students make take the course each semester until they complete the objectives of the course. A minimum of five hours of practice a week is required. Students who successfully complete MUSC 2212 will be able to:

  • Demonstrate correct performance playing/singing position and posture in performance.
  • Read and perform music literature at 4-6 level of difficulty.
  • Demonstrate the ability to perform individually.
  • Demonstrate understanding of music theory through performance.
  • Recognize key signatures of performed music and perform appropriate scales and arpeggios from memory.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of music vocabulary necessary for study, rehearsal, and performance of music.
  • Perform interpretations of standard/appropriate music repertoire.

Course Requirements:

  • Online assignments, quizzes, and tests
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

MYTH 1000 - Introduction to Mythology

MYTH 1000 is a study of the mythology of a selected culture. Discussion will include allusions to mythological tales and figures found in culture, literature, and the arts, as well as the function of myth in society. Students completing MYTH 1000 will be able to:

  • Identify mythological allusions in literature and the arts
  • Identify major characters of selected myths
  • Analyze the lesson(s) demonstrated by each myth.
  • Explain the similarities among myths of different cultures.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

NURS 1232 - Pre-Nursing Seminar

This course introduces nursing and healthcare history and theoretical framework, including Albany State University's nursing framework. Various theories of nursing and healthcare are explored. The role of the healthcare professional, including the nurse, is analyzed. Proficiencies supporting the role of the healthcare professional are explored and adopted.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

NURS 2111 - Nursing Care of Women and Children (ASN)

This class explores the roles of the nurse in safely providing quality, patient centered care within an interdisciplinary structure to meet the needs of families who have children. Applies principles of health promotion from the antepartal period through adolescence and examines human growth, development and responses to health deviation during these periods in the life cycle. Patient centered care and quality improvement are the central focus in the course. Informatics is emphasized when providing safe patient care. Classroom and clinical instruction involves providing nursing care to antepartal, intrapartal, postpartal and pediatric patients and incorporating evidence based practice and previously learned knowledge and skills.

Course Requirements:

  • Online quizzes, assignments, and discussion posts
  • Students must have the knowledge and ability to use Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel

Additional Requirements

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Proctored Tests – (Hybrid cohort only) This course can require 3 - 6 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

NURS 2117 - Nursing Leadership (ASN)

Emphasis is placed on the introduction of the fundamental principles of leadership and management responsibilities for the entry level registered nurse. Topics will include, but not limited to such practice issues as: safe, patient centered, quality care, effective delegation and supervision, communication, collaborative care, informatics, quality improvement. Nursing research and evidence based practice are also included.

Additional Requirements

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView - https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Proctored Tests – (Hybrid cohort only) This course can require 3 - 6 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

NURS 3000 - Nursing informatics

Nursing Informatics covers an introduction to information systems, ethical aspects, nurses' roles in informatics, HIPAA, professional development, and patient safety informatics tools.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion Program

NURS 3005 - Pathophysiology

The course introduces the pathophysiological basis of disease processes and common health problems. The focus of this course is on compromises in the body’s ability to meet its physiological needs and the role of the nurse in providing care.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program.

NURS 3010 - Intro to Professional Nursing

This course includes an introduction to professional nursing responsibilities and expectations and explores the role of the professional nurse in providing care. An investigation of major contemporary nursing issues to include the influence of history, nursing theory, legal issues, nursing philosophy, political activism, health care delivery systems, provision of culturally competent care, and current/ future challenges for the nursing profession. The ANA Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, and the Code of Ethics for Nurses are explored.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program.

NURS 3200 - Health Assessment

This course builds on the student's knowledge and skills in health assessment. Students further develop skills of history taking, inspection, papation, percussion, and auscultation and documentation of the health assessment. Normal findings and cultural and age variations of adults are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program.

NURS 3500 - Health and Wellness of Aging

Health and Wellness of Aging provides the most current information about best practices in gerontological nursing based on the most current research. The content ranges from biological, such as the etiology of common conditions and geropharmacology, to caring for persons with dementia, to understanding Medicare and aging and nursing in rural settings. This course introduces the standards for competencies required for gerontological nursing education and the promotion of health while aging.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program.

NURS 3600 - Nursing Informatics (RN-to-BSN)

The course teaches the history of healthcare informatics, current issues, basic informatics concepts, and health information management applications. This course addresses basic through complex concepts to target the needs of the novice through innovator. It provides a set of practical and powerful tools to ensure that students gain a solid understanding of Nursing Informatics and are able to move from information through knowledge to wisdom.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the RN-to-BSN Program Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NURS 3620 - Pathophysiology for RN (RN-to-BSN)

This course examines in detail the underlying biological process involved in the development, evolution, manifestations, and complications of common clinical deficits (diseases) across the life span, and compares normal and abnormal states. The biological bases for therapeutic actions are examined.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the RN-to-BSN Program

Offered: Fall, Spring

NURS 3630 - Conceptual Basis of Professional Nursing (RN-to-BSN)

This course examines the dynamic transformation in nursing through exploration and investigation of major nursing issues. These issues are examined within the context of nursing history, nursing theories, nursing philosophy, legal issues, political activism, health care delivery systems, and the delivery of culturally competent patient care.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the RN-to-BSN Program Offered: Fall, Spring

NURS 3640 - Health Assessment (RN-to-BSN)

This course includes the processes, techniques, and skills of health assessment, building on basic and experiential knowledge of assessment. It is intended to provide the basis for individual student development of expertise in assessing health and illness states. Focus is on didactic and clinical content that the practicing nurse utilizes when assessing clients. The processes of systematic assessment, which include communication, planning, and cultural variations are emphasized. Clinical judgment, diagnostic & monitoring skills, and teaching are integrated as components of assessment.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the RN-to-BSN Program Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NURS 3640 - Health Assessment (RN-to-BSN)

This course includes the processes, techniques, and skills of health assessment, building on basic and experiential knowledge of assessment. It is intended to provide the basis for individual student development of expertise in assessing health and illness states. Focus is on didactic and clinical content that the practicing nurse utilizes when assessing clients. The processes of systematic assessment, which include communication, planning, and cultural variations are emphasized. Clinical judgment, diagnostic & monitoring skills, and teaching are integrated as components of assessment. Prerequisite(s): Admission to the RN-to-BSN Program Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NURS 3650 - Health and Wellness of Aging (RN-to-BSN)

This course will provide the student with comprehensive evidence-based nursing protocols to be used in providing the highest level of care to adults in settings across the continuum. Aging is presented within a cultural and global context in recognition of diversity of all kinds and the health inequities which persist.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the RN-to-BSN Program

Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NURS 4010 - Principles of Nursing Leadership

This course focuses principles of leadership and management as a professional registered nurse. There will be exploration of roles, traits, and contributions of nurse leaders in clinical and managerial positions. Aspects of problem solving, effective communication, conflict resolution, decision-making, and team building are explored. The course is designed to assist in leadership self-awareness and encourage students to explore Transformational Leadership qualities. An analysis of trends and issues occurring in today’s workforce will assist students in exercising leadership skills.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program
Corequisites: NURS 4015

NURS 4015 - Leadership Practicum

This course focuses principles of leadership and management as a professional registered nurse. There will be exploration of roles, traits, and contributions of nurse leaders in clinical and managerial positions. Aspects of problem solving, effective communication, conflict resolution, decision-making, and team building are explored. The course is designed to assist in leadership self-awareness and encourage students to explore Transformational Leadership qualities. An analysis of trends and issues occurring in today’s workforce will assist students in exercising leadership skills.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program
Corequisites: NURS 4010

NURS 4400 - Community Health Nursing

This course provides a foundation in the practice of promoting and preserving the health of populations. The adult learner will apply knowledge and skills from nursing and the public health sciences to focus on health promotion and health maintenance of individuals, families, and groups within the community. Students will identify opportunities to provide health care to clients in a variety of settings based on concepts of client-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety and informatics.

Prerequisites: NURS 3200

Corequisites: NURS 4415

NURS 4415 - Community Health Practicum

This is a clinical course taken with Community Health Nursing. This course provides a foundation in the practice of promoting and preserving the health of populations. The student will apply knowledge and skills from nursing and the public health sciences to focus on health promotion and health maintenance of individuals, families and groups within the community. Students will identify opportunities to provide health care to clients in a variety of settings based on concepts of client-centered care, team work and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety and informatics. Students will participate in 60 hours of precepted practice in the clinical setting. Clinical experiences occur in a variety of public health and community-oriented settings and provide opportunities for population based nursing practice with vulnerable populations.

Prerequisites: NURS 3200
Corequisites: NURS 4400

NURS 4500 - Community/Public Health Nursing (RN-to-BSN)

This course is designed to assist the student in acquiring knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the professional community health nurse in a global society focusing on health promotion and health maintenance of individuals, families and groups. Students will explore concepts such as community assessments, public health policy, and surveillance. Prerequisite(s): All preceding courses in the RN-BSN nursing sequence. Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NURS 4510 - Research in Nursing (RN-to-BSN)

This course is designed prepare the undergraduate nursing student to be a consumer of research with a focus on nursing research. The student will be introduced to the research process and guided through understanding the written research report with an emphasis on the importance of evidence-based practice.

Prerequisite(s): Statistics and all preceding courses in the RN-BSN nursing sequence.

Offered: Spring, Summer

NURS 4520 - Principles of Leadership and Nursing Ethics (RN-to-BSN)

This is a course in leadership, management, and organizational theories. The course has an emphasis on ethical practices on all levels of interactions within the healthcare team that is providing nursing care to vulnerable populations. Prerequisite(s): All preceding courses in the RN-BSN nursing sequence. Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

NURS 4800 - Nursing Research

Nursing Research explores the research process and its relevance to nursing practice. The primary focus is on the development of the student’s ability to be an effective consumer of research with emphasis on the research process and its applicability in their professional role development.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program and MATH 2205

NURS 4900 - Ethical Issues in Nursing

This course focuses on ethical issues in health care by offering a thorough understanding in ethical theories, principles, models, and trends as reflected in contemporary nursing practice. Case studies of ethical issues and dilemmas in health care will provide the framework for ethical reasoning and decision-making. Particular emphasis will be given to the resolution of ethical dilemmas through moral and ethical reasoning to help bridge the gap between theory and nursing practice.

Prerequisites: Admission to RN to BSN Completion program

NURS 5100 - Adv. Health Assessment

This online course includes the processes, techniques, and skills of advanced health assessment, building on basic and experiential knowledge of assessment. It is intended to provide the basis for individual student development of expertise in assessing health and illness states. Focus is on didactic and clinical content that the advanced practice nurse utilizes when assessing clients. The processes of systematic assessment, which include communication and planning skills, are emphasized. Clinical judgment, diagnostic and monitoring skills and teaching are integrated as components of assessment.

NURS 5111 - Nursing Theory Devel

This course explores theoretical assumptions and conceptual models related to nursing practice, nursing research and nursing education. Other nursing, social, behavioral, and natural science theories are also discussed. This course provides an introduction to conceptual and theoretical thinking. Students will examine knowledge development in nursing, conceptual structures, and their uses as a basis for nursing practice and research.

NURS 5120 - Adv. Nursing Research

This course emphasizes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and the application of technology in data analysis. Students formulate a beginning approach to proposal development. Pre-Requisites: NURS 5111, Admission to Graduate Nursing Program or Approval of Graduate Nursing Program Coordinator.

NURS 5210 - Adv. Pathophysiology

This course emphasizes the complexity of normal physiological and psychological functions and the disruption of homeostasis in understanding the disease process and/or illness. The involvement of multi-systems in the clinical manifestation of the disease process and diagnoses will be delineated. (Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nursing Program)

NURS 5220 - Fam. Div. Vul. Comm.

The students apply concepts, theories, and methodologies of transcultural nursing to clients of diverse populations. Pre-Requisite: Admission to Graduate Nursing Program.

NURS 5410 - Intro. to Fam. Prim. Care

This course introduces the concept of primary health care of children, adults, and families. The focus is on health promotion and disease prevention with medically underserved populations. (Pre-Requisites: NURS 5100 & Admission to FNP Program)

NURS 5421 - Prim. Care of Children

The purpose of this course is to present the theoretical and clinical basis for advanced health promotion and disease prevention for children, adolescents, and their families. Content will include health maintenance, health teaching, behavioral/developmental issues, counseling, and advanced nursing management of well child health and selected common childhood illnesses. The focus is on comprehensive care for well child health maintenance and selected illnesses. Attention is directed toward the care needed to meet the health objectives for children, adolescents and families in Healthy People 2010 consistent with accepted national guidelines. Clinical experiences will provide opportunity for testing and integrating of theory in practice and development of relationships with other health care providers. Clinical experiences will occur in a variety of settings with emphasis on rural and urban underserved children, adolescents and families.

NURS 5621 - Adv. Practice Nursing I

The first of a two-clinical course sequence in application of theories and concepts related to the clinical nurse specialist role in Community Health, Parent-Child Health, and Psych-Mental Health. (Prerequisite: NURS 5210)

NURS 5910 - Pharm. in Adv. Practice

This course provides the advanced practice health care provider with knowledge of pharmacological agents used in treatment of adults, adolescents, and young children. Emphasis is on indications, mechanisms of action, prescriptive drugs, protocols, techniques, and dosages. (Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Nursing Program/Department Approval)

NURS 5950 - Curriculum Development

This course, designed to prepare the nurse educator for a role in curriculum development will explore putting together a nursing educational curriculum from planning to evaluation. (Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Nursing Program Coordinator )

NURS 6001 - Instructional Strats./ Eval

This course focuses on the implementation of various teaching strategies and the measurement of learning outcomes.

NURS 6101 - Prim. Care of Women

This course focuses on the implementation of various teaching strategies and the measurement of learning outcomes. Pre-Requisites: Admission to Graduate Nursing Program or Approval of Graduate Nursing Program Coordinator. (Prerequisite: NURS 5410)

NURS 6211 - Prim. Care of Adults

This course presents the theoretical and clinical basis for health promotion and disease prevention of adults/older adults and their families. Content includes health maintenance, health teaching, developmental issues, counseling and nursing diagnosis and management of common minor acute and chronic health problems found in adults. (Prerequisite: NURS 6101)

NURS 6211 - Prim. Care of Adults

This course presents the theoretical and clinical basis for health promotion and disease prevention of adults/older adults and their families. Content includes health maintenance, health teaching, developmental issues, counseling and nursing diagnosis and management of common minor acute and chronic health problems found in adults.(Prerequisites: NURS 6101)

NURS 6310 - Primary Care Issues/Health Prom/Comm

This seminar focuses on care needed to meet the needs of clients with sensitivity to community and cultural differences.

NURS 6310 - Prim. Care Iss./ Comm

This seminar focuses on care needed to meet the needs of clients with sensitivity to community and cultural differences.

NURS 6620 - Adv. Teaching Practicum

This practicum is designed to foster the student's development and competency as an educator. The focus of the experience is the application of curricula and learning theories to instructional design for nursing education. The practicum consists of experiences in both classroom and clinical teaching under the supervision of a senior faculty. The experiences are designed to provide an opportunity for the student to experience a career in the academic world of higher education.

NURS 6622 - Adv.Practice Nursing II

This is the second of the two-clinical course sequence in application of theories and concepts related to the clinical nurse specialist role development in Community Health, Parent-Child Health and Psych-Mental Health Nursing.

NURS 6820 - FNP Practicum

An integrated clinical practicum focused on development and implementation of the advanced practitioner role. Students are involved in a preceptorship in rural/urban family practice settings under the supervision of a clinical preceptor and graduate faculty. (Pre-Requisites: Completion of all coursework)

NURS 6920 - Thesis/Scholarly Project

Research methodologies are used to investigate a nursing problem. Satisfactory completion of a thesis or research project is required. The student may choose to develop the proposal from NURS 5120 for the research activities for this course. (Prerequisite: NURS 5120)

OATC 3150 - Computer Operating Systems - eMajor Only

An general overview of computer hardware, networks, and operating systems. Developing basic technological expertise and leadership in administering computer technology in the workplace is emphasized. This course helps prepare students to take a certification exam for a current operating system.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

OATC 3610 - Web Design and Multimedia - eMajor Only

Development of the knowledge and skills necessary for utilizing web editing and graphics programs effectively. This course will focus on the design and production of web sites and other materials for use in educational and training environments.

Prerequisites

  • CISM 2201 or consent of instructor

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

OATC 3700 - Desktop Publishing - eMajor Only

Development of desktop publishing concepts and their application to the modern office. Basic, intermediate, and advanced features of a variety of application programs for page design will be used to create various business-related documents.

Prerequisites

  • CISM 2201

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

OATC 4020 - Virtual Office Technology - eMajor Only

Overview of skills needed to perform as a virtual office assistant. Emphasis placed on the use of time and information management applications and increased knowledge of the role of online meeting, Internet telephone communication software, Internet research, social networking tools, e-commerce, and mobile devices in the modern office.

Prerequisites

  • ACED 2400 or CISM 2201

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

OATC 4160 - Administrative Office Procedures - eMajor Only

Development of increased awareness of the role and scope of the administrative assistant position. This course will focus on basic and expanded job responsibilities, professionalism, and the performance of simulated office activities.

Prerequisites

  • ORGL 2050 and OATC 3400

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

OATC 4810 - Contemporary Skills - eMajor Only

Analysis of the workplace skills needed in a rapidly changing technological society. Emphasis is on communication skills, employee motivation, change management, delegation, team building, and career planning. Students are required to build a career plan and to design a change management project.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

OCEX 2290 - Occupational Experience

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: Completion of 9 semester hours with a 2.00 GPA and approval of instructor.

OCEX 2290 is directed work experience with a business firm, government agency, or other organization under the Cooperative Education program in an area of a student’s preparation and interest. Cooperative Education may or may not count toward degree requirements. Students who successfully complete OCEX 2290 will be able to:

  • Gain work experience relevant to their chosen field of study.
  • Develop a career plan
  • Create a professional resume.
  • Reflect upon their career goals.
  • Assess their skills that will contribute to their success in their chosen career field.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GAView D2L

ORGL 1100 - Leadership in a Global Society

Students learn how cultural context affects leadership style, conflict negotiation, and ethical decision making; examine how leaders might impact culture; and develop their own multicultural awareness and competencies. Contemporary cases of how leadership varies depending on cultural context are researched. Key geographical regions of the world will be analyzed from a leadership perspective, and an individual cultural experience highlighting the intersection of leadership and culture also occurs.

ORGL 1500 - Profiles of Leaders

The objective of this course is to focus on the basic principles of personal and interpersonal leadership through the exploration of various leaders. It uses the case study method to analyze several well-known leaders. Students will explore the motivation, decision-making, time management, power, team building, conflict resolution, and change management of pivotal leaders.

ORGL 2050 - Communications for the Workplace - eMajor Only

Principles of effective oral and written communications. A thorough review of grammar, sentence and paragraph construction, punctuation and writing techniques. Emphasis on the job-getting process.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ORGL 2100 - Writing for Leadership

Move beyond the inspirational poster! In this course, students read and study the works of famous leaders as models for their own communications as leaders. Students will learn to analyze the rhetoric and persuasive techniques in the speeches, writings, and rhetoric of leaders both real and fictional, such as Shakespeare’s Henry V, Winston Churchill, Sun Tzu, Marcus Aurelius, Queen Elizabeth I and others, while reading excerpts from contemporary business advice literature. Themes for the class will include: How to Inspire, How to Navigate Change, and How to Change Minds

ORGL 2601 - Introduction to Public Administration

This course introduces students to Public Administration, which is a sub-field of Political Science. Administrative aspects of Political Science will be examined, focusing on concepts and methods used to analyze public policy, political systems, governmental structures, bureaucracy, government and public management, and public policy planning.

ORGL 2800 - Ethics and Leadership

The objective of this course is to explore the theories, models, and constructs related to the study and practice of ethics and leadership. Teaches students to develop ethical decision-making strategies, communicate effectively in diverse group settings, value civic engagement and actively apply ethical leadership skills.

ORGL 2900 - Program and Policy Evaluation for Leaders

Students will learn the methods of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating policy and program information used in organizational evaluations. Program and policy evaluation assists program managers and policy makers (leaders) in making decisions about which programs to fund, policies to modify, expand or eliminate. Students will learn how to be critical and effective users of evaluations. This course will examine a broad range of social and organizational policy areas including health, criminal justice (public sector), education, public finance, human services, and development.

ORGL 3000 - Reflective Seminar 1: Self as Learner - eMajor only

Graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory". An introduction to the major conceptual frameworks for reflective learning that require students to reflect on and document their own assumptions, beliefs, and biases and how they affected their prior learning experiences. - Restricted to BS-ORGL Majors.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ORGL 3050 - Reflective Seminar II: Self in Context - eMajor only

Graded "satisfactory" or "unsatisfactory." A seminar that develops the student's understanding of the conceptual frameworks for reflective learning.

Restricted to BS-ORGL students.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ORGL 3200 - Introduction to Organizational Development - eMajor only

A broad survey of major topics in Organizational Development including but not limited to Introduction to organizational process; creation of organizational growth climates/cultures; examination and selection of effective leadership styles and effective modes of communication; coping with the future in periods of accelerating change. - Restricted to BS-ORGL Majors.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ORGL 3400 - Technology for Organizations - eMajor only

Development of intermediate and advanced skills in the use of spreadsheet, database, communication and presentation software. Emphasis is placed on creation of computer projects appropriate to the student's plan of study.

Prerequisite: CISM 2201 or equivalent

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ORGL 4000 - Reflective Seminar III: Transforming Self - eMajor only

Graded "satisfactory'' or "unsatisfactory." A seminar including critical self-evaluations of prior learning experiences using frameworks for reflection and analysis, as well as the development of the student’s own capacity to adapt and transform their own learning practices.

Restricted to BS-ORGL students.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ORGL 4690 - Capstone Seminar in Organizational Leadership - eMajor only

A capstone course in which students combine reflection on prior learning with research and analysis on the learning outcomes of their current degree program and specialization; culminating in a life learning paper that addresses their own abilities and limitations as learners and their progress in their degree program.

Restricted to BS-ORGL students.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

ORGL 4900 - Organizational Internship - eMajor only

Students may receive academic credit for personal experience in non-profit organizations, the political process, or public employment. Credit hours only apply toward electives.

Prerequisites

  • POLS 1101

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

PADM 5011 - Public Administration: Scope, Dev. & Ethical Environment

This course is an overview of the scope of administration as a field of study and as a profession.

PADM 5126 - Organizational Theory and Bureaucratic Behavior

This course examines the organizational dynamics in modern organizations. To that end, it will examine the organizational dynamics in modern organizations, the evolution of organizational theories from the classic to the contemporary, the linkages and relationships between organizations and the behavior of human beings in organizational environments.

PADM 5202 - Administrative Law

The legal aspects of the power and procedures of federal and state agencies in the judicial re- view of administrative actions are discussed.

PADM 5213 - Legal Environment of Public Human Resources Management

This course examines the relationship between the law and the work environment with particular emphasis on the rights and protections that are provided to employees under the law as well as the court decisions that impact the rights and liberties of public and nonprofit sector employees.

PADM 5262 - Public Human Resources Management

This course will help students to understand the historical, economic, social, legal and organizational contexts in which human resources management occurs in the public sector. It will also focus on the acquisition of skills, knowledge and abilities needed to execute HR functions including, but not limited to, recruitment, selection, planning compensation, training, professional development and sanctions.

PADM 5300 - Administration of Nonprofit Organizations

This course will provide theoretical and application understanding of the operation of corporations in the nonprofit sector. It is designed to equip students with knowledge and skills of basic methods used to lead and manage such organizations and successfully navigate the political, financial, ethical and social challenges of this sector.

PADM 5302 - Public Budgeting & Financial Management

This course focuses on the allocation of limited resources to address the problems that governments and other public organizations face. To that end, it will examine public budgeting process and public financial management approaches. Emphasis is placed on the budget cycle, federal budget practices and procedures, unified budgets, national income accounts, the budget cycle, executive and legislative roles in the budget process, Government Accounting, Financial Reporting, Government Auditing, Capital Planning and Budgeting, Capital project Analysis and Asset Management.

PADM 5321 - Foundations of Health Care Finance

This course explores the basics of health care finance. It focuses on topics of expenditures, revenue generation, fund-raising, budgeting and financial planning in health care administration.

PADM 5322 - Foundations of Public Health Administration and Management

This course will provide a comprehensive introduction and overview of public health management and administration.

PADM 5324 - Epidemiology: Concepts and Methods

This introductory course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the basic definitions, concepts, principles and methods of population-based epidemiologic research.

PADM 5451 - Labor-Management Relations

This course focuses on the history and contemporary relations between labor and management, as well as the laws and practices impacting collective bargaining in the public sector. It also examines, within the context of current labor management relation, those issues that may affect workforce planning and development and organizational effectiveness.

PADM 5501 - Management Information Systems for Public Management

The course introduces students to computer applications and information system tools for effectively managing large amounts of data in public sector organizations. The course also introduces concepts and theories of management information systems (knowledge management), various practices in government organizations, as well as related issues, problems, and trends.

PADM 5502 - Research Design and Data Analysis

This course is designed to acquaint students with the assumptions, concepts and methods for quantitative and qualitative scientific inquiry and basic data analysis techniques useful in public administration and nonprofit management research.

PADM 5551 - Diversity Management and Public Organizations

The course will provide a broad-based perspective of diversity management in the workplace. It will examine the contemporary workforce, which represents multiple differences, including, for example, gender, race, culture, ethnicity, age, alternate lifestyles and physical/mental abilities.

PADM 5600 - Issues in Human Resources Management

The course examines issues in managing public human resources.

PADM 5616 - Human Capital Development & Management

This course examines the skills, knowledge, abilities and other characteristics that constitute the concept of human capital and how they impact organizational performance. Based on those attributes, the course addresses issues of strategic human resource planning, strategic human resources management, succession planning as well as the planning tools, techniques and methods for proper human capital management.

PADM 5635 - Introduction to Community & Economic Development

To examine community and economic development movement in the United States and abroad. The understanding of the physical urban environment and local economic development.

PADM 5650 - Executive Leadership: Principles of Public Administration

Examines leadership skills necessary to maximize group effectiveness in public and volunteer organizations. Considerable use will be made of role-playing and/or simulation exercises.

PADM 5781 - Introduction to Public Policy

The course emphasizes the nature and definition of public policy, the structure in which public policy is produced and how various kinds of public policy are made.

PADM 5791 - Health Care Policy and Politics

This course deals with contemporary health-care policies and politics. The course includes discussions of the current crisis in health costs and proposed solutions.

PADM 5810 - Intergovernmental Relations

Emphasizes the issues and problems involved in the relationships among federal, state and local governments

PADM 5823 - Program Development, Management & Evaluation

A study of basic methods used to evaluate programs and policies, including an examination of the impact which selected policies have had on intended target populations.

PADM 5831 - Urban and Rural Community Planning

This course is a survey of the principles and practices of public planning for the development and management of human, economic and physical resources of communities. Reviews planning systems at various levels and their interrelationships.

PADM 5851 - Professional Public Service Internship/Project

This practicum includes a final professional project in which the student will design, conduct, analyze and report on a project completed during his/her professional service internship.

PADM 5907 - Capstone Report (Exit Process)

This course requires students to complete a written practitioner-based report on a case study that demonstrates their mastery of the material presented in the core courses of the MPA program. The case study must be supported by scholarly literature and students will have to orally defend it to demonstrate their mastery of the chosen subject matter. The capstone report serves as an exit process component designed to assess students’ knowledge and skills obtained in these academic courses, competency in critical thinking, and written and oral communication skills.

PARA 1110 - Introduction to the Paralegal Profession

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

This course introduces the paralegal profession and the structure, function, and procedures of the legal system. Courtroom procedures, preparation of documents, case analysis, legal reasoning, career opportunities, certification, and professional affiliations will be explored with an emphasis on issues of ethics and confidentiality. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses. Students who successfully complete PARA 1110 will be able to:

  • Define a paralegal and explain their duties.
  • Understand the paralegal educational options and discuss the substantive and procedural nature of the paralegal curriculum.
  • Discuss the role of the ABA, AAfPE, NALA, and NFPA in paralegal education and certification.
  • Identify career opportunities for paralegals and understand where to access current employment openings.
  • Engage in career planning and create an employment portfolio that best markets your skills and abilities.
  • Explain the rules relating to competence, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest.
  • Define and explain the unauthorized practice of law.
  • Prepare for the interviewing of clients and the investigation of cases.
  • Explaining the civil litigation process
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the court system, both state and federal.
  • Understand various substantive areas of law, including tort law, product liability, consumer law, contracts, intellectual property, insurance law, real property, agency, business organizations, employment law, estates, family law, bankruptcy, and criminal law.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

PARA 1120 - The Understanding of Law

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110

This course provides an introduction to the substantive areas of law, including contracts, property, torts, estates and probate, and criminal law, with an emphasis on developing practical paralegal skills. Students will analyze complex factual scenarios and will develop basic legal research and writing skills. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses. Students who successfully complete PARA 1110 will be able to:

  • Develop a basic understanding of the American court and legal system, both criminal and civil.
  • Develop a familiarity with the basic areas of civil and criminal American law.
  • Develop a familiarity with the different areas of civil law; i.e., torts contracts, property, domestic relations, business law, estates and probate.
  • Develop a familiarity with jurisdiction and civil procedure.
  • Develop basic legal analytical, research, and writing skills.
  • Know the basic skills and roles of the paralegal

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 1130 - Legal Research and Writing Online

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110

This course provides an introduction to legal research techniques using primary and secondary authorities’ and writing various legal documents. Students will develop legal research skills through the use of traditional resources and computerized legal research software. Preparing and writing legal documents relating to legal research will be emphasized. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses Students who successfully complete PARA 1130 will be able to:

  • Locate and use primary and secondary authorities.
  • Understand the federal and state court systems.
  • Find and use the elements of a court decision.
  • Locate cases by using print digests.
  • Brief a case.
  • Check citations for currency.
  • Compile a legislative history.
  • Find and use administrative regulations.
  • Write a client letter.
  • Write a legal memorandum.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

PARA 1140 - Litigation and Trial Practice

Credits: 3 PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course presents fundamental concepts and procedures of civil litigation including the rules of civil procedure, rules of evidence, and common law principles with an emphasis on the role of the paralegal. Students will explore all phases of litigation, including discovery, trial preparation, alternative dispute resolution, and post-trial issues while focusing on their role and ethical obligations as members of a litigation team a grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 1150 - Real Estate Law

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course provides an overview of the substantive law of real property and offers an examination of the procedural and practical aspects of property law with an emphasis on the role of the paralegal and the preparation of forms common to real estate transactions. A comprehensive overview of recording statues, title abstraction, title insurance, surveys, mortgages, leases, deeds of trust, and closings is provided. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses. Students who successfully complete PARA 1150 will be able to:

  • Understand the basic laws of real property ownership;
  • Understand the differences in concurrent ownership of real property;
  • Understand the concepts of legal descriptions of real property and land surveys;
  • Understand public and private restrictions on the use of real property;
  • Learn and explain the requirements of a valid real estate contract and remedies of the default of same;
  • Review real estate contracts for both residential and commercial property and learn how to draft same;
  • Identify the types of deeds in real estate practice and how to draft a deed;
  • Identify and explore key real estate financing documents and learn how to prepare same, along with mortgage forms and provisions;
  • Recognize the importance of title examinations in real estate transactions and understand the procedures involved;
  • Learn the importance of title insurance in real estate transactions;
  • Understand all aspects of a real estate closing, along with government laws, regulations and the forms involved;
  • Review laws and regulations pertaining to residential and commercial leases.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

PARA 1160 - Wills, Trusts, and Estates

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course presents fundamental concepts of the law of wills, trusts, and estate administration with an emphasis on the role of the paralegal. Students will examine the procedures, techniques, and the substantive law and will be exposed to legal documents commonly used in the administration of wills, trusts, and estates. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 2110 - Family Law

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course introduces principles, trends, and laws governing domestic relations, including the topics of marriage, annulment, divorce, alimony, child custody, property division, adoption, and other related topics, with an emphasis on the paralegal's role. Students will develop legal skills through mock exercises and case documentation and will examine court proceedings and e1hical issues relevant to family law. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses. Students who successfully complete PARA 1160 will be able to:

  • Understand what premarital agreements are, their primary purposes and what an agreement covers,
  • Understand the different types of marriage and how the definition is evolving;
  • Learn what an annulment is and its consequences;
  • Discuss how the concept of family has changed over the years and discuss cohabitation;
  • Learn and discuss at length the divorce process from initiation to conclusion and the paralegal’s role;
  • Discuss discovery and financial statements in the context of a divorce;
  • Learn what the various types of child custody are and discuss the implications of a child custody case;
  • Understand how child support guidelines are applied from state to state, especially in GA;
  • Understand in what circumstances spousal support may be awarded and the different types of spousal support
  • Understand what factors a court looks at in deciding how property should be allocated in a divorce;
  • Discover the differences between a separation agreement and a divorce;
  • Discuss how parentage and paternity is determined and established in the courts;
  • Learn the various types of adoption and the major court steps in the process;
  • Learn the special considerations family violence presents in the law.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 2120 - Contract Law

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of contract law with an emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics will include formation, performance, and enforcement of contracts under the common law and the Uniform Commercial Code, breaches of contracts, and available remedies. There will be an examination of specific contracts and draft documents that are the subject of frequent litigation. Students will develop legal skills through case documentation and will examine court proceedings and ethical issues relevant to contract law. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 2124 - Tort Law

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of substantive tort law. Also included in this course is an introduction to the practical skills necessary for paralegals practicing in the tort law area. Some of the topics covered in the course are general tort law, negligence, defenses to negligence actions, intentional torts, and injuries to property, liability, strict and absolute liability, product liability, and medical and legal malpractice. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses. Students who complete PARA 2124 should be able to:

  • Understand substantive tort law
  • Identify torts and know the essential elements of the various torts
  • Understand concepts important in tort law such as negligence, defenses to negligence actions, intentional torts, products liability, and medical and legal malpractice.
  • Develop legal skills through case documentation and examination and examination of court proceedings and ethical issues relevant to tort law
  • Understand the resources available to paralegals and where to access those resources to serve clients effectively.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

PARA 2130 - Bankruptcy Law

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course provides an overview of the laws of bankruptcy and the rights of creditors and debtors with an emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics will include relevant common and statutory law, bankruptcies, and reorganization from the perspective of both creditors and debtors. Students will develop legal skills through case documentation and will examine court procedures and ethical issues relevant to bankruptcy law. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Course.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 2140 - Employment Law

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course provides an overview of employment and labor law with an emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics will include contract negotiation, contracts of employment, governmental regulations, discrimination issues, and worker's compensation. Students will develop legal skills through case documentation and will examine court proceedings and ethical issues relevant to employment and labor law. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 2160 - Special Topics in Paralegal Studies

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course provides students with an opportunity to study selected advanced topics or current issues in the law relevant to paralegal students. Students may repeat this course as long as different topics are offered and as long as they do not exceed the maximum number of hours permitted. A maximum of six credit hours in special topics may be applied toward program graduation requirements in the Associate of Applied Science Degree. A maximum of three credit hours in special topics may be applied toward the certificate. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PARA 2164 - Criminal Law and Procedure

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PARA 1110 or permission of the program director.

This course provides an overview of criminal law and the criminal trial process with an emphasis on the paralegal's role. Students will explore the history and structure of the American legal system, relevant common and statutory law, constitutional protections, the identification and basic elements of crimes, and the criminal trial process. Students will become well-informed about the resources available to paralegals and where to access those resources to serve clients effectively. A grade of C or better is required in all Paralegal Courses.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PHIL 1010 - Critical Thinking

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: Satisfactory English scores to place into co­ requisite remediation or higher.

This course is designed to introduce students to the thinking processes used to analyzing, evaluating and creating information. The purpose of the course is to promote intellectual inquiry and exchange through the application of critical thinking of personal, professional and sociopolitical contexts. Students who successfully complete PHIL 1010 will be able to:

  • Identify the critical thinking process.
  • Describe perceptual blocks to critical thinking: personal barriers, sensing, and physiology.
  • Explain the role of language in the critical thinking process.
  • Explore the role of critical thinking in persuasion.
  • Explain the impact of feelings on the critical thinking process.
  • Apply sound rational reasoning to problem solving.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion forums
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PHIL 2030 - Ethics

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: PHIL 2205 or permission of instructor.

A general introduction to ethical theories and their application to moral issues as well as an exposure to dominant meta-ethical approaches. Emphasis is placed on the student developing a decision-making scheme to apply to moral dilemmas. Credit may not be received for both PHIL 2030 and ETH! 110I.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

PHIL 2101 - Introduction to Philosophy

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 or permission of instructor

A survey of the major sub-fields of philosophy including epistemology, ontology, logic, ethics, social and political philosophy, aesthetics and philosophy of religion. Key problems that concern contemporary philosophers are explored and the dominant positions explained. Students who successfully complete PHIL 2101 will be able to:

  • Know a few major figures in the history of philosophy
  • Identify some philosophical questions central to the way human persons experience and create meaning. Also, know the way these ideas developed historically, and how they were influenced by culture and how they help to shape future cultures.
  • Develop skills in careful and accurate reading and interpretation of philosophical texts.
  • Develop skill in responsible critical engagement with and evaluation of texts.
  • Develop skill in dialogue around philosophical issues.
  • Engage in a deeper reflection on the world in which he/she lives, his/her place in the world, and his/her options and choices.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

PHIL 4120 - Professional Ethics - eMajor Only

This course introduces students to ethical issues common to the professions. The term “profession” is a label for a class of occupations, exemplified by the traditional model of the lawyer or physician. We will think about characteristics of these occupations that distinguish them as a class and how these characteristics are related to a variety of ethical problems.

*POLS 4860 may also be used to satisfy this requirement in the degree program.

This course is part of the eMajor collaborate program degree. The tuition for this course is at the current eMajor rate.

PHSC 1011K - Physical Science I

Credits: 4 Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on mathematics placement test or completion of ENGL 0989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher; MATH 0987, MATH 0989 or satisfactory math scores to place into corequisite remediation of higher.

This course is a brief survey of the important aspects of physics and astronomy. The goal of this course is to provide students with a solid background concerning basic topics in physics and astronomy including topics on basic mechanics, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, universal galaxies, stars and planets. This course is for students not majoring in mathematics or science and will not count toward graduation if a physics course is presented for graduation. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. This course cannot be used with PHYS 1111 to satisfy Area D for students majored in sciences.

Students who successfully complete PHSC 1011K are expected to be able to:

  • Interconvert and make use of various units/systems of measurement.
  • Describe and distinguish the various types of motion; express the laws of motion.
  • Express the relationships between work and energy and list some sources of energy.
  • Distinguish and measure heat and temperature; define the laws of thermodynamics.
  • Identify and define the properties of sound and light waves.
  • Identify and define the properties of electricity.
  • Identify types of nuclear processes.
  • Identify the laws of planetary motion and describe the solar system.
  • Describe the earth’s coordinate systems, time zones and the relation between the earth, sun and seasons.
  • Describe some features of the moon and relation between the earth, sun and phases of the moon.
  • Identify the life stages of the stars and the hierarchy of the universe systems.
  • Perform measurements using laboratory instruments and data acquisition devices and use the scientific method in safely carrying out laboratory experiments.

Course Requirements:

  • Laboratory exercises utilizing basic household materials
  • Online Quizzes, tests, and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Lab Science Fee: $20.00
  • Instructor Mutisya:Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Scientific Calculator (non-graphing) – graphing calculators are fine, but not required.
  • Safety Glasses– should comply with ANSI Z87.1-1989, “American National Standard Practice of occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection” (Make sure the safety glasses purchased are stamped with Z87, which signifies they meet OSHA standards.)
  • Laboratory exercises use basic household materials
  • Students may have to purchase sundry items. However, most students should have most of the items in their pantry or garage.

PHSC 1012K - Physical Science II

Credits: 4 Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on mathematics placement test or completion of ENGL 0989 or satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher; MATH 0987, MATH 0989 or satisfactory math scores to place into corequisite remediation of higher.

This course is a brief survey of the important aspects of chemistry and geology. The goal is to provide students with a solid background concerning basic topics in chemistry and geology. This course is for students not majoring in mathematics or science and will not count toward graduation if chemistry is presented for graduation. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. This course cannot be used with CHEM 1100 or CHEM 1211 to satisfy Area D for students majored in sciences.

Students who successfully complete PHSC 1012K are expected to be able to:

  • Solve problems by utilizing the scientific method/Employ the scientific method to carry out laboratory exercises.
  • Compare, contrast and make use of various systems of measurement.
  • Demonstrate the use scientific notation and significant figures.
  • Recognize and write common chemical symbols, chemical formulas, and chemical equations.
  • Describe the periodic table of elements and use the periodic table to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the elements.
  • Describe chemical reactions and explain the factors that can influence the rate of chemical reactions.
  • Describe the characteristic properties of acids and bases.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of chemical bonding.
  • Describe the various types of rock formation (igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary) and the relevance to the rock cycle.
  • Compare the various types of plate motion according to the theory of plate tectonics.
  • Identify and discuss the various aspects of igneous activity.
  • Compare and contrast the properties and characteristics of igneous, metamorphic, sedimentary rocks.
  • Describe the composition and structure of the atmosphere.
  • Discuss the various types of storms and state the atmospheric effects that give rise to storms.
  • Discuss how the topics covered in the course content relate to the laboratory exercises.
  • Demonstrate an increased understanding of laboratory safely and procedures.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the important aspects of chemistry and geology and how these scientific principles relate to the world around us.

Course Requirements:

  • Completion of laboratory exercises at home or at another suitable location
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications
  • Instructor Mutisya: Proctored Tests – This course requires 4 proctored tests. Students may test at Albany State University campuses (East, West or Cordele) or online through Proctor U. Further information regarding proctored tests (including pricing structures for Proctor U) can be found within the course. Proctor U requires a computer (not a mobile device) with a webcam and microphone.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Safety Glasses (stamped with Z87)
  • Basic household materials for labs

PHYS 1111K - Introductory Physics I

Credits: 4 Prerequisites: MATH 1113

This is an introductory course in physics for science majors. Trigonometry is frequently used. It covers include mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, and rotational motion and statics), and may also include thermodynamics and waves mechanics, thermodynamics and waves. It promotes students understanding of natural phenomena as well as analytical critical thinking skills. A glimpse of the practical application of physics in everyday life is highlighted. Physical concepts as well as problem solving skills are stressed in this course. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.” . Students receiving credit for PHYS 1111K cannot receive credit for PHYS 2211K. Cannot be used with PHSC 1011 to satisfy Area D.

Students who successfully complete PHYS 1111K are expected to be able to:

  • Solve problems by utilizing the scientific method. Employ the scientific method to carry out laboratory exercises.
  • Compare, contrast, and make use of various systems of measurement.
  • Demonstrate the use of scientific notation and significant figures.
  • Perform calculations using vector notation.
  • Do physics motion problems in one, two, and three dimensions.
  • Describe the energy of a system and understand the difference in energy types. Understand Momentum and perform corresponding calculations for linear motion and rotational motion.
  • Understand static equilibrium and elasticity.
  • Describe waves and wave types.
  • Understand the concepts of Thermodynamics.
  • Be capable of critical thinking and problem solving.

Course Requirements:

  • Laboratory assignments (may be completed at home)
  • Online Quizzes, tests, and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • LoggerPro II software (downloaded from the course website).
  • Scientific Calculator- Non-graphing
  • Safety Glasses – should comply with ANSI Z87.1-1989, “American National Standard Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.” (Make sure the safety glasses purchased are stamped with Z87, which signifies they meet OSHA standards.)

PHYS 1112K - Introductory Physics II

Credits: 4 Prerequisites: PHYS 1111K

This is the second part of the introductory physics and covers electrostatics, electric current and circuits, and electromagnetism, and may also include optics and modern physics. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.”

Prerequisite: A grade D or better in PHYS 1111.

Students who successfully complete PHYS 1112K are expected to be able to:

  • Solve problems by utilizing the scientific method. Employ the scientific method to carry out laboratory exercises.
  • Compare, contrast, and make use of various systems of measurement.
  • Demonstrate the use of scientific notation and significant figures.
  • Perform calculations using vector notation.
  • Do physics motion problems in one, two, and three dimensions.
  • Describe the energy of a system and understand the difference in energy types. Understand Momentum and perform corresponding calculations for linear motion and rotational motion.
  • Understand static equilibrium and elasticity.
  • Describe waves and wave types.
  • Understand the concepts of Thermodynamics.
  • Be capable of critical thinking and problem solving.

Course Requirements:

  • Completion of laboratory assignments at home
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Scientific Calculator- Non-graphing
  • Safety Glasses- with Z87 stamp

PHYS 2211K - Principles of Physics I

Credits: 4 Prerequisites: MATH 1211

This is an introductory course in calculus-based physics for Chemistry and Pre-Engineering majors. This course covers mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, and rotational motion and statics), and may also include thermodynamics and waves. Elementary differential calculus is used. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

Students who successfully complete PHYS 2211K are expected to be able to:

  • Make measurements and convert units
  • Describe motion of rigid bodies in one and two dimensions using fundamental and derived quantities
  • Use Newton’s laws of motion to solve motion of rigid body problems
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the work-energy theory as applied to rigid bodies in motion, compute the kinetic energy and potential energy of rigid bodies.
  • Use the law of conservation of mechanical energy in the solution of the motion of rigid bodies
  • Demonstrate the ability to use the linear impulse-linear momentum principle in solving rigid body problems, to apply the conservation of linear momentum principle to impact problems in rigid body dynamics.
  • Use the two conditions of equilibrium to solve static equilibrium problems for rigid bodies.
  • Define and identify oscillatory motion and mechanical waves
  • Use Newton’s Gravitational Law to describe the motion of celestial bodies.
  • Use the laws of thermodynamics and the concept of heart transfer to explain the operations of thermodynamics systems.

Course Requirements:

  • Completion of laboratory assignments at home
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Scientific Calculator- Non-graphing
  • Safety Glasses- with Z87 stamp

PHYS 2212K - Principles of Physics II

Credits: 4 Prerequisites: PHYS 2211K

This is the second part of calculus-based introductory physics course for Chemistry and Pre-Engineering Majors. This course covers electrostatics, electric current and circuits, and electromagnetism, and may also include optics and modern physics. Elementary calculus will be used. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.

Students who successfully complete PHYS 2212K are expected to be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and concepts of electromagnetism and apply to the solution of force and field problems.
  • Use the basic theories to work direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) circuits.
  • Describe the laws of optics and use in the solution of problems.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of optical instruments and utilize in laboratory.
  • Define and identify the major branches of modern physics.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the important processes in atomic physics
  • Describe nuclear processes and calculate the energy released in each nuclear process.

Course Requirements:

  • Completion of laboratory assignments at home
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

  • A computer with appropriate plug ins to successfully run GeorgiaView. See& https://albanystate.view.usg.edu/d2l/login – click System Checker
  • Scientific Calculator- Non-graphing
  • Safety Glasses- with Z87 stamp

POLS 1101 - American Government

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: None

This course is an introduction to essentials of national government and an overview of the American political system. It examines the constitutional foundation of the system and its development over time, including modules on political institutions; campaigns and elections; and non-governmental entities, such as political parties, interest groups, and the media, including the role of political culture in American politics. The course also includes a module on the Georgia State government, and satisfies the legislative requirement for Georgia Government. Students who successfully complete POLS 1101 will be able to:

  • Identify and differentiate the basic terms and concepts of Political Science
  • Formulate a useful framework within which students can acquire knowledge and understanding of the meaning and significance of politics and government.
  • Analyze the nature and importance of constitutional democratic political culture, particularly the basic political values and beliefs underlying American constitutional democracy.
  • Compare the American constitutional democracy and other types of political systems.
  • Identify the origins and continuing development of the American constitutional system, including the relationships among the principal organs of the national government and those between the national government and the states.
  • Identify, distinguish and describe the principal institutions and processes of American national government and politics.
  • Identify and analyze major policy issues in the contemporary American political system.
  • To identify and distinguish the primary institutions and processes of GA government and politics.

Course Requirements:

  • This course uses Open Educational Resources - no textbook purchase is required.
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

POLS 1105 - Current World Problems

Credits: 2 Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: Satisfactory English scores to place into co-requisite remediation or higher

An introduction to the political issues that transcend national boundaries such as the environment, population, immigration, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, religion, natural resources, etc. Students who successfully complete POLS 1105 will be able to:

  • Identify and analyze political concepts, such as state, power, national interests, as they apply to the study of global issues.
  • Compare and contrast global issues as they different regions and countries.
  • Talk intelligently about many of the big issues of the day and to enter into conversations about these issues with others.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

POLS 2101 - Intro to Political Science

A survey of different areas of political science, basic concepts and approaches to the study of Political Science, the nature of the state, government and law in society.

Prerequisite: POLS 110I.

Course Requirements:

  • Participate in discussion questions
  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic knowledge of computers and computer applications

Additional Requirements:

POLS 2401 - Introduction to Global Issues

Credits: 3 Prerequisite: POLS 1101 with a grade of C or better

An overview of the structure and processes of the international political-economic system, including topics such as economic and social interdependence, international trade, war and power, oil politics, green politics and the problems associated with developing countries. Students who successfully complete POLS 2401 will be able to:

  • Explain key international events by applying realist, liberal, and “identity” approaches to the study of international Relations.
  • Compare and evaluate explanations for war and prescriptions for peace in the international system.
  • Analyze the concept of globalization and apply it to contemporary changes to the international system.
  • Analyze theories of development and underdevelopment and apply them to the political economy of the Global South.
  • Analyze and evaluate the role of international institutions and “low politics” in transforming the international system.

Course Requirements:

  • Online Quizzes and assignments
  • Basic-advanced knowledge of computers, computer applications, and trouble-shooting.

Additional Requirements:

POLS 3201 - Public Policy - eMajor only

An analysis of diverse public policy issues, as well as the decision process leading